• Curing Title: title insurer who obtains quit claim deeds in favor of insured, which, under Louisiana law, rendered title “free of rational substantial doubt,” cures the alleged defect and renders title marketable within the meaning of the title insurance policy – Martin v. Fidelity Nat’l Title Ins. Co., No. 13-30013 (5th Cir. Aug. 5, 2013) (affirming judgment)
  • Closing Protection Letters: CPL issued without “successors or assigns” language is not enforceable by a subsequent owner of the loan made by the lender who was original addressee of the letter – U.S. Bank N.A. v. Lawyers Title Ins. Corp., No. 09013702 (Super. Conn. July 11, 2013) (granting in part, denying in part insurer’s motion for summary judgment)
  • Commitment: title insurance commitment is not invalid merely because the insurer’s independent agent neglects to attach the commitment jacket – U.S. Bank N.A. v. Lawyers Title Ins. Corp., No. 09013702 (Super. Conn. July 11, 2013) (granting in part, denying in part insurer’s motion for summary judgment)
  • Standing: assignee of lender sufficiently alleged that title insurance policy and closing protection letter had been assigned to it in order to withstand motion to dismiss – Aurora Loan Services, LLC v. Hirsch, No. 106008973 (Super. Conn. June 28, 2013) (denying motion to dismiss) (copy not publicly available)