On August 29, the FDA announced a recall of 465,000 implantable pacemakers, citing concerns that hackers may be able to take control of the pacemakers’ settings. This would open patients up to danger from improper pacing or rapid depletion of the devices’ batteries, according to the FDA’s statement. Instead of removing and replacing the pacemakers, the recall is designed so that doctors will install a firmware upgrade that removes the vulnerability.

Newsfactor reports that there have been no reported exploits of the vulnerability and no devices have yet been compromised.

The recall highlights that medical device manufacturers are beginning to take a more focused approach to cybersecurity. Mac McMillan, CEO of privacy and cybersecurity firm Cynergistek, told Modern Healthcare that “If devicemakers didn’t already have developers sitting around looking at cybersecurity, they now have to incur the costs of making sure their devices stay current. In the past, they’ve developed devices and put them on the market and moved onto the next device. This is a new thing for them.”

Mike Kijewski, CEO of medical device security company Medcrypt, also suggested that the FDA should update its regulations to help medical device companies stay on top of cybersecurity threats. “If the FDA can say you’re just doing the update for cybersecurity and the changes are minimal and the functionality of the device isn’t changing, they can make the update happen faster,” Kijewski suggested.

Canada’s equivalent of the FDA, Health Canada, is still looking into the vulnerability and its proposed solution, and has set a target of 75 days to resolve the situation.