• The chief executive of Barclays has said he sees no reason to shift British jobs to Europe as a result of Brexit and described the restructuring required as straightforward compared with other challenges faced by the bank, such as setting up a US holding company, as required by the US authorities last year, or preparing to ring-fence Barclays’ high street bank from its risky investment banking arm by 2019. His remarks contrast with those of rivals such as Deutsche Bank which has warned 4,000 roles could go from London, while US bank JP Morgan is preparing to move up to 1,000 bankers out of the City to Dublin, Frankfurt and Luxembourg. (The Guardian)
  • British technology investors face being cut off from Europe’s largest single source of venture capital funding, in a sign that the UK’s relationship with European institutions is weakening even before its official exit from the EU. The European Investment Fund, a public-private partnership which accounts for more than a third of investment in UK-based venture capital funds, is slowing its activity in Britain and turning away funds that may have otherwise been eligible for investment, according to industry figures. (FT)
  • Jean-Claude Juncker has admitted it was a “serious mistake” to leak details of his private dinner with Theresa May, but the EU Commission president has denied he was behind the information getting out. A diplomatic row erupted earlier this month after German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ) was given detailed information about the nature of the discussions. It reported that EU officials and Mr Juncker were surprised that Ms May did not appear to be fully briefed for the meeting and claimed she had unrealistic expectations about the length and process of negotiations. (The Independent)
  • Media coverage of the EU referendum campaign was dominated by “overwhelmingly negative” reports about the consequences of migration to the UK, according to a new report. King’s College London’s centre for the study of media, communication and power (CMCP) looked at more than 15,000 articles published online by 20 national news outlets. The study (pdf) found that immigration and the economy were the two most-covered issues in coverage described by as “acrimonious and divisive”. (The Guardian)