Notification and clearance timetable

Filing formalities

What are the deadlines for filing? Are there sanctions for not filing and are they applied in practice?

A merger notification has to be submitted to the CPA no later than 30 days after the conclusion of the agreement, the announcement of a public bid or the acquisition of a controlling interest (whichever of these triggering events occurs first). If the CPA requests the parties to notify the concentration because their combined market share in Slovenia exceeds 60 per cent (see question 5), the merger notification must be submitted no later than 30 days from receipt of this request.

In case of a failure to notify the concentration within the filing deadline, the CPA may impose fines in the amount of up to 10 per cent of the annual turnover generated by the undertakings involved in the concentration (including other undertakings belonging to the same group) in the preceding business year. In addition, a fine between €5,000 and €10,000 may be imposed on the responsible persons of such undertakings and (if applicable) a fine between €3,000 and €5,000 on a natural person already controlling at least one undertaking.

If the nature of the infringement of the filing obligation is particularly serious (eg, owing to the amount of damage inflicted, the pecuniary benefit, the infringer’s intent or unlawful gain), a fine between €15,000 and €30,000 may be imposed on the responsible person of a legal entity, and (if applicable) a fine of between €10,000 and €15,000 on a natural person already controlling at least one undertaking.

With regard to the sanctions for closing before clearance, see question 12.

Which parties are responsible for filing and are filing fees required?

Concentrations that consist of a merger or acquisition of joint control have to be notified jointly by the undertakings involved in the merger, or by those acquiring joint control. In all other cases, the undertaking acquiring control is responsible for the filing.

The filing fee is determined by the Administrative Fees Act. At present, it amounts to €2,000.

What are the waiting periods and does implementation of the transaction have to be suspended prior to clearance?

The intended concentration must not be implemented prior to clearance, as undertakings are not allowed to exercise rights and obligations arising from the intended concentration until the CPA issues a clearance decision (suspension obligation).

In the event the CPA requested the parties to notify the concentration because their combined market share in Slovenia exceeds 60 per cent (see questions 5 and 9), the undertakings must cease implementing the concentration as of the date of receipt of this request.

Under exceptional circumstances, the CPA may (upon the request of the parties) permit the implementation of the concentration prior to clearance, if such an implementation is essential to maintain the full value of the investment or to perform services of general interest.

The suspension obligation does not have an effect on the implementation of public bids pursuant to the Slovenian Takeovers Act, provided that the acquirer does not exercise voting rights (or exercises them only according to a permit for early implementation granted by the CPA).

The duration of the waiting period depends on whether Phase I or Phase II proceedings are applied (see question 17).

Pre-clearance closing

What are the possible sanctions involved in closing or integrating the activities of the merging businesses before clearance and are they applied in practice?

In the case of closing before clearance, the CPA may impose fines (see question 9).

In addition, the CPA may file a legal action with the competent civil court to declare the implementation (the exercise of rights and obligations), which is contrary to the suspension obligation, null and void (articles 12(4) and 44(3) of the Act). We are not aware that this legal action has so far been filed by the CPA.

Also, according to article 53 of the Act, the CPA may impose measures on the undertakings concerned to restore the situation prevailing prior to the implementation, in particular through the division of the undertaking or the disposal of all the shares acquired. The latter of these measures has recently been applied in a merger between two Slovenian newspaper companies (the acquirer was ordered to dispose of the acquired 75 per cent shareholding).

Are sanctions applied in cases involving closing before clearance in foreign-to-foreign mergers?

The sanctions for closing before clearance are also applicable with regard to foreign-to-foreign mergers. We are not aware of any specific cases where these sanctions have recently been applied.

What solutions might be acceptable to permit closing before clearance in a foreign-to-foreign merger?

In principle, foreign-to-foreign concentrations are assessed in the same way as local concentrations. Hence, under exceptional circumstances, the CPA may (upon the request of the parties) permit the implementation of the concentration prior to clearance, if such implementation is essential to maintain the full value of the investment or to perform services of general interest (see question 11).

The Act does not explicitly provide for hold-separate (carveout) solutions. Given that the Slovenian merger control regime assesses the effects of a merger in the Slovenian market (see question 19), depending on the transaction structure, one could argue that it is possible to carve out the transaction steps related to the Slovenian market and to proceed with the implementation outside Slovenia without infringing the Slovenian suspension obligation. Although widely discussed in practice, we are not aware that such solutions have been tested with the CPA so far.

Public takeovers

Are there any special merger control rules applicable to public takeover bids?

Public takeover bids are primarily monitored by the Slovenian Security Market Agency and subject to the provisions of the Slovenian Act on Takeovers. The CPA has to be informed of the intended public bid by a simple written notice on the day such intention is published. Also, the CPA must be provided with the bid document (ie, the prospectus).

Public takeovers that lead to notifiable concentrations within the meaning of the Act require the submission of a merger notification to the CPA no later than 30 days after the announcement of the public bid (see question 9). Importantly, the suspension obligation does not apply to the implementation of public bids within the meaning of the Slovenian Takeovers Act, provided that the acquirer does not exercise voting rights or exercises them only according to a permission for early implementation granted by the CPA.

Documentation

What is the level of detail required in the preparation of a filing, and are there sanctions for supplying wrong or missing information?

The information and documentation to be submitted in a merger notification is set out in the Decree Defining the Contents of the Concentration of Companies Notification Form (the Form). The Form requires the parties to provide quite substantial information on the concentration, as well as on the relevant markets, market shares and market size. Inter alia, the following needs to be provided:

  • information on the parties to the concentration (eg, name, registered seat, contact person, nature of business, ownership and control; personal and financial links and previous acquisitions; annual reports);
  • description of the intended concentration;
  • originals or certified copies of all documents on the basis of which the concentration takes place;
  • definition of the relevant markets;
  • total size of the relevant markets and market shares of the undertakings concerned;
  • information on main competitors, customers and suppliers, the structure of supply and demand, market entry, relevance of research and development, efficiency gains, etc;
  • information on indispensable ancillary restrictions; and
  • (if available) copies of analyses, reports or studies related to the relevant market.

The Slovenian merger control regime does not provide for a short-form notification. Therefore, as a general rule, each notification has to include all the (detailed) information requested in the Form. However, if the (combined) market shares after the concentration are lower than 15 per cent (horizontal relationships) or 25 per cent (vertical relationships) in the relevant product market, the parties may limit information in relation to such markets. In any case, however, the parties must provide information on the size of the relevant markets, their turnover and market shares in such markets, and information about the largest competitors and their market shares.

The parties may also request from the CPA a waiver from providing certain information required by the Form, if the entire set of such information is, in the opinion of the parties, not necessary for the accurate and complete filing and the assessment of the case.

If some of the information requested in the Form is not available to the parties, this must be stated in the filing, together with information on where the CPA may obtain such information.

The notification and all documents attached thereto need to be submitted in the Slovenian language. Documents on the basis of which the concentration takes place must be provided in certified copies; all other documents attached to the filing may be provided in simple copies.

The notification needs to be complete and include accurate and true information. If information is missing in the notification, the CPA may request from the notifying party to supplement the required information within the deadline set by the CPA. The notifying party’s failure to supplement the notification will trigger a legal presumption that the transaction has not been filed and will make the notifying party subject to the sanctions for failure to notify concentrations (see question 9).

Investigation phases and timetable

What are the typical steps and different phases of the investigation?

The CPA decides in Phase I proceedings if the concentration does not raise serious doubts as to its compatibility with the Slovenian competition law rules. The CPA then must issue its decision within 25 working days of the receipt of a complete notification.

In cases that raise serious doubts as to their compatibility with the Slovenian competition law rules, the CPA initiates Phase II proceedings within 25 working days of receipt of a complete notification. Once the CPA has initiated Phase II, it must issue a decision within 60 working days of initiating such proceedings.

If the parties propose remedies, the deadline for issuing the Phase I or Phase II decision is extended by an additional 15 working days.

The waiting period starts running only once a complete notification has been submitted. Hence, if the CPA finds that the submitted notification does not contain all mandatory information, it will issue a request for additional information and the clock does not start running.

There is no legal presumption that the concentration has received approval once the waiting period expires. In general, the parties may in such a case file a legal action with the Administrative Court of Slovenia.

What is the statutory timetable for clearance? Can it be speeded up?

See question 17. The Act does not provide for the possibility of obtaining a waiver or expedited proceedings and there is no formal procedure in respect of extensions of the waiting periods. There is no legal presumption that the concentration has obtained approval once the statutory waiting period has expired (see question 11). Therefore, depending on the workload of the CPA, in practice Phase I clearance decisions are often rendered around two to two-and-a-half months after the submission of the notification.