Given the present economic climate of falling metal prices and depressed equity markets for mining companies, many owners and operators of mines are experiencing cash flow and working capital shortages.  As a result, contractors and others who provide services or materials to mines, whether in the exploration, development, or production phases of such projects, are increasingly looking to miners lien legislation to help them increase their leverage when seeking payment of outstanding accounts.

Miners’ liens are unique legal and potentially powerful tools.  Therefore, those involved in working on or operating a mine, as well as lenders, should have some awareness of the impact of the filing of such liens on mineral tenures and on the interests of any secured creditors.

What is a lien?

In general terms, a lien is a charge against property, including mineral tenures, granted to a person who provides services or materials which improve that property as long as there has been compliance with the rules in the applicable lien legislation.  The property acts as security for the debt owing to the lien claimant.  Therefore strict compliance with the statute is required in order to get the benefits of the lien.

Lien legislation is different in each province and territory.  All Canadian jurisdictions have builders lien legislation that applies generally to improvements and services provided to property, but the northern territories have special miners lien legislation.  Where miners lien legislation exists, it is that legislation and not the builders lien legislation that applies to mining projects.

Miners Lien Acts north of 60 – who can lien for what?

In each of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, the applicable Miners Lien Act provides a statutory framework for claiming a miners lien.  There are currently two different lien legislation regimes: one in the Yukon and another in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

In the Yukon, a lien is provided to a contractor or subcontractor who provides services or materials to a mine “preparatory to, in connection with, or for an abandonment operation in connection with” the recovery of a mineral.  The lien is provided on “all the estates or interests in the mine or mineral concerned” as well as on the mineral itself “when severed and recovered from the land while it is in the hands of the owner”.  The lien is also on “the interest of the owner in the fixtures, machinery, tools, appliances and other property in or on the mines or mining claim”.  In addition, a person who rents equipment to an owner, contractor or subcontractor has a lien for the rent while the equipment is being used or reasonably required to be available for the purpose of the mine.

In the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, a person who performs any “work or service on or in respect of” or “places or furnishes any material to be used in the mining or working of a placer or quartz mine or mining claim” has a lien for the price of the work, service or material on “the minerals or ore produced from and the estate or interest of the owner in the mine or mining claim”.

How to claim a lien and time limits

Under the Miners Lien Acts, there are two initial steps required to claim a lien: first, file a claim of lien, and second, start an action.

Firstly, a lien claimant must file a claim of lien in the mining recorder’s office against the applicable mineral tenures within the prescribed time period.  This time period differs between the Yukon and the Northwest Territories/Nunavut.  The applicable time periods are summarized in the chart below.  The claim of lien must be supported by an affidavit which verifies the facts in the claim of lien, and the claim of lien must include:

  1. The name and residence of the claimant, owner of the property and of the person for whom the work, service or material was provided;
  2. A description of the work or service performed or material furnished and the time period within which it was performed or furnished;
  3. The amount claimed as due or to become due;
  4. The description of the property to be charged; and
  5. The date of the expiration of the period of credit agreed to by the lien holder for payment for the work, service or material of the lien holder where credit has been given.

Secondly, a lien claimant must start an action within the prescribed time period in the Supreme Court in the Yukon or the Northwest Territories or in the Nunavut Court of Justice in Nunavut. In addition, the lien claimant must file a certificate from the court in the mining recorder’s office against the liened mineral tenures. Again, this time period differs between the Yukon and the Northwest Territories/Nunavut, and the applicable time periods are summarized in the chart below. The certificate notifies anyone searching at the mining recorder’s office that the mineral tenure is subject to a legal proceeding.

Priority

Assuming there has been compliance with the legislation, a miners lien gives a lien claimant limited priority over mortgage and other encumbrance holders.  This priority can be important if the mineral tenures are subject to secured financing the amount of which is equal to or exceeds the value of the mineral tenures.  In such a scenario, the lien claimant may only be able to recover the amounts which have priority over the secured financing.  Therefore it is important for all the players to understand the scope of the priority.

The following chart summarizes the applicable steps and timelines to claim a miners lien in Yukon and in the Northwest Territories/Nunavut, and the priority granted by such liens.

Click here to view table.

Impact of liens

Some of the key impacts of miners’ liens for participants in mining projects are summarized below:

Owners & Operators: Owners and operators should be aware of the impact miners liens can have on their debt covenants and should properly manage relationships with contractors, suppliers and lenders when experiencing cash flow and working capital shortages.

Contractors & Suppliers: Contractors and suppliers should be aware of lien legislation, and take timely action to perfect a lien because failure to comply with the strict requirements in lien legislation can have dire consequences.  Once perfected, a lien can provide leverage to a contractor or supplier in the settlement of outstanding accounts with an owner.

Lenders: Lenders need be aware that a portion of their security may be subordinated to lien claims. Lenders can ensure there are protective covenants in security documents which contemplate the lenders’ recourse in the event a claim of lien is filed.