• Wait 15 years. This approach applies the 15-year statute of limitations to cases of adjoining property owners who are mistaken about where the line is between their properties and treat another boundary line, typically a fence, as the property line.
  • Get into a dispute, then compromise. Where the acquiescence falls short of the statutory period, the boundary line can be fixed as a result of a bona fide dispute as to its location, after which the parties deliberately agree to a boundary line.
  • Deed up to the boundary. This form of acquiescence occurs when a grantor intends to deed to a physical monument or marker to which adjoining land owners have previously acquiesced, but the deed contains an incorrect legal description that does not properly reference the monument. This theory does not require a lapse of time nor a compromise after a dispute.