A recent federal district court case raises significant issues regarding privilege that should be on the radar of any in-house or outside counsel conducting an internal investigation with the goal of producing a public report. As discussed in a recent Privilege Points, the investigation at issue was conducted for the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and focused on evaluating its business practices and the standard of conduct for its directors. As part of the investigation, the law firm conducted more than 30 interviews and created 51 interview memoranda, all of them marked as work product. The law firm created an investigative report of its findings and the WMATA board publically released the report.

In civil litigation related to the investigation, plaintiffs sought production of the interview memoranda. The court’s decision, Banneker Ventures, LLC v. Graham, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 74155 (D.D.C. May 16, 2017), held that WMATA had waived privilege as to the subject matter of the memoranda by publically releasing the report. A key point of the decision was that the final report had extensively cited to the interview memoranda, referencing many of the memoranda multiple times. The court also focused on the fact that WMATA had tried to use the final report as part of its defense to the civil litigation and that as a matter of fairness it could not then refuse to disclose the underlying memoranda.

The decision, if followed by other courts, raises significant questions regarding internal investigations and suggests several best practices for organizations considering beginning internal investigations:

  • Have a clear understanding of the goals of an investigation from the onset including whether a public report will be desirable.
  • Generate interview memoranda and other documents with the understanding that they may become public if there is a public report.
  • When drafting a public report, consider whether a report with less specific detail or more general statements could accomplish the same goal while being more likely to preserve privilege.
  • Consider releasing only an executive summary or a report drafted specifically to be a high-level description of findings.
  • Consider avoiding citation to or detailed discussion of confidential underlying documents.

Most importantly, when determining whether to publically release a report of an investigation, any organization should be aware of the likelihood that such a release will waive privilege, and consider the potential implications for civil litigation and government investigations.