We have recently become aware (again) of fake emails purporting to emanate from the CRA and informing the recipient that he/she has received an Interac email money transfer (i.e., a surprise refund).

Generally, the text of these emails is as follows:

Dear TaxPayer,

Canada Revenue Agency has sent you an INTERAC e-Transfer  (previously INTERAC Email Money Transfer).

Amount: $827.71 (CAD) Sender’s Message: A message was not provided Expiry Date: 10 October 2014

Action Required: To deposit your money, click here: [fake URL here]

2014 Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) Online Support

These are scam emails and the recipients should never open any attachments or links that may accompany or be embedded in the emails.

The CRA has previously warned about these types of phishing scams:

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) warns all taxpayers to beware of telephone calls or emails that claim to be from the CRA but are not. These are phishing and other fraudulent scams that could result in identity and financial theft.

People should be especially aware of phishing scams asking for information such as credit card, bank account, and passport numbers. The CRA would never ask for this type information. Some of these scams ask for this personal information directly, and others refer the taxpayer to a Web site resembling the CRA’s, where the person is asked to verify their identity by entering personal information. Taxpayers should not click on links included in these emails. Email scams may also contain embedded malicious software that can harm your computer and put your personal information at risk.

Examples of recent telephone scams involve threatening or coercive language to scare individuals into pre-paying fictitious debt to the CRA. These calls should be ignored and reported to the RCMP (see contact information below).

Examples of recent email scams include notifications to taxpayers that they are entitled to a refund of a specific amount, or informing taxpayers that their tax assessment has been verified and they are eligible to receive a tax refund. These emails often have CRA logos or internet links that appear official. Some contain obvious grammar or spelling mistakes.

These types of communication are not from the CRA.

More information is available the CRA’s Security webpage.

Recipients of these scam emails should report the email to info@antifraudcentre.ca or contact the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.