On February 25, 2010, Canada's Department of Finance released its proposed harmonized sales tax (HST) place of supply rules which will be used to determine whether a supplier (Seller) must charge, collect and remit HST in connection with a supply made in Canada and whether a recipient (Buyer) must pay HST in connection with an acquisition or importation and at what rate. Simply put, the proposed HST place of supply rules will be used to determine in which province a supply is considered to have occurred for HST purposes.

The proposed place of supply rule for real property is relatively straight-forward. With respect to the place of supply rule for real property, the Department of Finance did not make any changes to the current rule applicable in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, & Newfoundland and Labrador.

A supply of real property will be considered to be made in the province in which the real property is situated. If the real property being supplied is located in British Columbia, HST will be applicable at the rate of 12%. If the real property being supplied is located in Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick or Newfoundland and Labrador, HST will be applicable at the rate of 13%. If the real property being supplied is located in Quebec, Prince Edward Island, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta or one of the three territories, HST will not be applicable. However, GST would be applicable at the rate of 5%.

The Department of Finance provides the following example:

A sale of a warehouse situated in Sarnia, Ontario will be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component).

Some other examples would be:

  • A sale of timber lands situated in British Columbia will be subject to HST at a rate of 12 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 7 per cent British Columbia component).
  • A sale of vacant land situated in Goderich, Ontario will be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component).
  • A sale of a resource property (the land component) in Alberta, will not be subject to HST, but will be subject to GST.

In addition, the supply of an interest in real property is considered to be a supply of real property and the HST place of supply rules for real property would apply. For example, an option to purchase real property would be considered to be real property. If a recipient pays an amount for the right to purchase a leased factory in 10 years, the payment would subject to HST if the factory is located in the HST Zone (British Columbia, Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick or Newfoundland and Labrador.

The lease of real property is also considered to be a supply of real property. For example, a lease of office space in Toronto, Ontario will be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component).

If a company in Ontario leases a commercial office building in British Columbia, the supply of real property will be considered to be made in British Columbia. As a result, HST would be imposed at a rate of 12 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 7 per cent British Columbia component) despite the fact the company is incorporated under the laws of Ontario. The key fact is that the real property that is being leased is located in British Columbia.

There will be situations where a person owns real property in more than one Canadian province and transfers all or some of its assets to another person. For example, a large Canadian company with real property assets in Ontario and Quebec sells all of the assets of its business. In this case, it is proposed that the place of supply rules will deem there to have been separate supplies of real property in Ontario and Quebec. The transfer of the real property located in Ontario would be subject to HST at a rate of 13 per cent (a 5 per cent federal component and an 8 per cent Ontario component). The transfer of the real property located in Quebec would be subject to GST at a rate of 5 per cent and would not be subject to HST (would be subject to QST).

Conversely, a payment made to break a real property lease would be considered to be a supply of real property and would be subject to HST if the real property is located in the HST Zone.