• For the first time in 16 years, more than 2,000 employees of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (“BART”) district went on strike. Maintenance workers, members of SEIU Local 1021, as well as station agents and train operators, members of Amalgamated Transit Unit 155, and administrative and professional workers represented by American Federal of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 3993 sought a wage increase of 21.5 percent over the next four years. BART said the issue was an increase in health care contributions by workers, who currently pay $92 per month. The employees returned to work four days later, when their bargaining contract was extended for 30 days.
  • City workers from Oakland, California instituted a one-day work stoppage affecting 3,500 workers represented by International Federation of Professional and Technical Employees Local 21. The workers were protesting a 10 percent cut in their take-home pay.
  • Forty food court workers at buildings owned by the General Services Administration (“GSA”) in Washington, D.C. went on a one-day strike. The workers delivered a letter to a GSA administrator at his home and held a rally in front of the GSA building to demand that the GSA enforce labor laws, improve conditions for the employees of private contractors, and eliminate wage theft. Recently, Good Jobs Nation filed a complaint with the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor, alleging that food court workers were not paid overtime and were in some cases paid less than minimum wage.
  • Also in Washington, D.C., 70 workers at Union Station staged a one-day strike. The fast food, retail, and janitorial workers, organized by Good Jobs Nation, sought increased wages. The workers protested in the Union Station retail concourse, then staged a protest inside the mall’s McDonald’s, and ended up at the Department of Transportation building to deliver their demands. The organizers sought to encourage President Obama to sign an executive order requiring government contractors to pay workers a living wage.