Seyfarth Synopsis: As recent triple-digit temps have shown, California is still one of the hottest places to be—literally. Today’s post reminds all employers, especially with employees who work outdoors or in open-air environments, that OSHA, Cal-OSHA, and the California Labor Code all prescribe protections from the heat.

California rest and recovery breaks.

California employers must provide non-exempt employees with a paid 10-minute rest break for every four hours worked or major fraction thereof. Refresh your recollection of the rest-break requirement here. And employers in certain industries should recall their additional obligations to help outdoor workers avoid heat-related illnesses by providing water, shade, and additional rest breaks, as required by California’s regulations.

The heat illness prevention regulations

Who is subject to heat illness prevention regulations? Anyone with outside workers, but the list of industries commonly affected includes:

  • Agriculture
  • Construction
  • Landscaping
  • Oil and gas extraction
  • Transportation or delivery

What does California require regarding outdoor places of employment? Employers must establish, implement, and maintain an effective heat illness prevention plan for outdoor workers. The Department of Industrial Relations offers detailed instructions and tips to help employers comply with state laws. Below are some main concerns:

Drinking Water. In addition to mandatory break periods, employees must have access to potable water that is “fresh, pure, suitably cool, and provided free of charge.”

Shade. If temperatures exceed 80° F, employers must maintain an area with shade at all times that is either open to the air or provides ventilation or cooling.

High-heat procedures. When temperatures exceed 95° F, employees in the industries specifically listed above must be given a minimum 10-minute cooldown period every two hours. These breaks may be concurrent with meal or other rest periods when the timing aligns properly.

What should I do if a worker suffers from heat-related illness? If a worker shows any signs of heat-related illness, a supervisor should be prepared to respond with first aid or other medical intervention—and should not permit a worker showing any symptoms of heat-related illness to resume working until the worker has sufficiently recovered from the symptoms.

Federal OSHA guidance

Federal laws and regulations, of course, also apply in California. The attached Management Alert contains some timely information about the four types of heat illness and what you can do to protect yourselves and your employees from this hazard.