• In an analysis of duration and frequency of work stoppages amongst various unions, a study found that from 2002 through 2011, the Teamsters lead the pack with the highest number of strikes, and the longest in duration, however the Teamster strikes generally involved the fewest number of employees. The following is a full list of unions included in the study, and their average work stoppages and durations: (1) Communications Workers of America (50 stoppages; 3,938 workers per event); (2) United Food and Commercial Workers (81 stoppages; 1,196 workers per event); (3) United Auto Workers (113 stoppages; 1,116 workers per event); (4) United Association of Plumbers and Pipe Fitters (48 stoppages; 981 workers per event); (5) International Union of Operating Engineers (84 stoppages; 716 workers per event); (6) UNITE HERE (77 stoppages; 704 workers per event); (7) Service Employees International Union (201 stoppages; 633 workers per event); (8) International Association of Machinists (180 stoppages; 611 workers per event); (9) International Brotherhood of Teamsters (534 stoppages; 340 workers per event); (10) United Steelworkers (183 stoppages; 314 workers per event).
  • The AFL-CIO initiated a national consumer boycott of American Crystal Sugar Co. products in response to the company’s 14-month lockout of approximately 1,300 workers. AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said that the union hopes “that this boycott will encourage Crystal Sugar to finally respect its workers, who worked so hard every day to make Crystal Sugar a highly profitable industry leader.” The company locked out workers Aug. 1, 2011, one day after they voted to reject the company’s final offer that included a 14 percent increase in wages over the contract term, and proposed moving workers to the company's health insurance plan, which would increase out-of-pocket costs for health care. The company’s has been operating the five beet sugar processing plants with temporary replacement workers since the lockout began.
  • Entergy Corp. locked out security officers at its Grand Gulf Nuclear Station in Port Gibson, Miss. who are represented by United Government Security Officers of America. The company initiated the lockout when the party’s contract expired without a renewed contract in place. While the company says it “remains committed” to bargaining in good faith, it did not indicate that either party has made any effort to continue negotiations.
  • Bombardier Learjet employees who are members of the International Association of Machinists (IAM) Local 639 in Wichita, Kan. went on strike two days after the members rejected the company’s last, best, and final offer. 79 percent of the voting members rejected the company’s proposal, which included annual wage increases of 1 percent in years two through five, and lump sum payments totaling $2,000 over the course of the five years. While union representatives say employees were not happy with the wage increases, the largest sticking point was the company’s healthcare proposal which eliminated the company HMO, and replaced it with a point-of-service plan and a health saving account which, according to union reps, more than doubles employees’ co-pays and deductibles.
  • Non-union Wal-Mart employees in four states walked off the job in protest of the company’s poor wages, working conditions, and illegal retaliation of its employees. It is unclear exactly how many employees participated in these work stoppages; however while more than 50 workers in the Dallas metro area took part in the strike, only one worker in Cleveland participated.
  • Owners and operators of five nursing homes in Connecticut, whose employees have been on strike since July, filed a federal lawsuit against two SEIU affiliates alleging RICO violations. Specifically, the lawsuit claims that the unions engaged in an illegal corporate campaign to shut down the nursing homes if they do not conceded to the union’s numerous demands. According to the company, “the suit seeks to end the campaign of extortionate demands and myriad unlawful tactics used against the companies” by the unions.
  • Boeing engineering and technical workers who are members of the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA) voted almost unanimously to reject Boeing’s contract proposals. The rejected proposals included wage increases the union asserts are either at or below the rate of inflation, increased out-of-pocket expenses for medical costs, and eliminated defined benefit pensions for future hires in favor of a 401(k) plan. SPEEA articulated specific concern with Boeing’s insertion of language that gives Boeing “unilateral authority to make changes in medical, retiree medical, layoffs, and retirement.”