• The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)'s Office of Special Counsel has entered into a settlement agreement with Tuscany Hotel and Casino, LLC in Las Vegas. The DOJ alleged that the company discriminated against non-citizens in the employment eligibility verification and reverification processes. Specifically, the government alleged that the hotel impermissibly held non-U.S. citizens to a different standard during the I-9 employment eligibility verification and re-verification process by having them provide additional or different documents or information and by asking that specific documents be presented, beyond what is required and allowed under federal law. The hotel has agreed to pay nearly $50,000 in back pay and civil penalties, train its personnel on the immigration laws pertaining to discrimination, and provide periodic reports, including copies of certain completed Forms I-9, to the Justice Department for 3 years.
  • The DOJ also reached settlement with Advantage Home Care, LLC, a New Jersey-based home health care provider, after an investigation into claims of immigration-related discrimination against lawful permanent residents in the employment eligibility verification process. The initial allegation stemmed from an erroneous report of an invalid Social Security number. Under the settlement agreement, Advantage Home Care agrees to pay nearly $50,000 in back pay and civil penalties, work to identify and reimburse additional individuals that were harmed in the similar scenario, train its human resources personnel on the immigration laws pertaining to discrimination, and be subject to compliance monitoring and reporting requirements for 3 years.