In the continuing drama of the Allison Engine case, the Sixth Circuit, last week, revived relators’ “claims” by overturning the District Court decision and further deepening a circuit split on the issue of how to interpret the word “claims” in section 4(f)(1) of the Fraud Enforcement and Recovery Act of 2009 (FERA). Roger Sanders v. Allison Engine Company, Inc. et al., Nos. 10-3818 (6th Cir. Nov. 2, 2012).

History

Readers will recall that this case began its journey in 1995 with relators’ filing a False Claims Act complaint against several Navy subcontractors. The case went to trial and, at the close of relators’ case, defendants filed a motion for judgment as a matter of law, arguing that relators had failed to produce evidence that any false claim was presented to the Navy. Without evidence of presentment, defendants argued, no reasonable jury could find a False Claims Act violation. The district court agreed. On appeal, however, the Sixth Circuit held that 31 U.S.C. section 3729(a)(2) did not require presentment of a claim to the government. In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court disagreed, and it held that a person must have intended to get a false or fraudulent claim “paid or approved by the Government” in order to be liable. Dissatisfied with this outcome, Congress revised the statute itself, removing the language from section 3729(a)(2) on which the Court had based its decision and making its revision retroactive for “all claims under the False Claims Act . . . that [were] pending on or after” June 7, 2008 (i.e., two days before the Supreme Court’s Allison Engine decision).

Current Dispute

After FERA’s passage, the Allison Engine defendants filed a motion to preclude retroactive application of the amended provisions of False Claims Act section 3729. The district court granted the motion, finding that the retroactivity language in FERA section 4(f)(1)—which arguably had been enacted to address this very case—did not apply. The court’s rationale was grounded in an inconsistent use of terms between FERA section 4(f)(1) and 4(f)(2)—the first provision relating to pending “claims” under the False Claims Act, the second relating to pending “cases.” Among other things, the court reasoned that the differences in terminology between the two sections suggested a Congressional intent to assign different meanings to them. Interpreting “claim” to mean “any request or demand . . . for money or property” (i.e., the definition for False Claims Act section 3729, to which FERA section 4(f)(1) applies), the district court found that although the Allison Engine “case” may have been pending in June 2008, no “claims” were pending. Further, the court reasoned, even if section 4(f)(1) could be read to apply to the pending case, such application would violate the Ex Post Facto clause of the Constitution.

Sixth Circuit Decision

Back to the Sixth Circuit on appeal, the case has taken yet another turn. In its decision last week, the court reversed the district court ruling, holding that “claim” in section 4(f)(1) does mean “case.” (It also held that such application does not violate the Constitution.) While crediting the presumption that Congress uses different words to convey different meanings, the court nevertheless determined that such an argument was undermined in this case. In particular, the court was persuaded by the facts of the FERA drafting process (namely, that the two section 4(f) provisions were drafted by different chambers of Congress at different times) and the fact that other places in the False Claims Act plainly use the term “claim” to mean “civil action or case.” Because the court’s decision put it squarely on one side of a circuit split with the Second and Seventh Circuits—while the Ninth and Eleventh circuits, as well as many district courts, take the opposite view—it remains to be seen whether Allison Engine will take another ride to the Supreme Court before its journey ends.

The decision itself is attached; a copy can also be found at the following link: http://www.ca6.uscourts.gov/opinions.pdf/12a1129n-06.pdf