Seyfarth Synopsis: The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has found a seven percent increase in 2016 fatal injuries reported over those reported in 2015. BLS noted that this was the third consecutive increase in annual workplace fatalities. The statistics show an ongoing struggle for employers with a number of occupational safety and health health hazards.

By industry or workplace, BLS found that work injuries involving transportation incidents remained the most common fatal event in 2016, accounting for 40 percent of all industries. Workplace violence and other injuries by persons or animals increased 23 percent, becoming the “second-most common work related fatal event in 2016.” For more information about workplace violence we have frequently blogged on the topic. See for instance, Airport Active Shooter Incident — What Can Happen in Just 15 Seconds, and What Business Needs to Know, OSHA Updates its Enforcement Procedures Directive for Exposure to Workplace Violence, Proposed Rule for Prevention of Workplace Violence in Healthcare and Social Assistance Industries, and NIOSH Offers Free Training Program to Help Employers Address Safety Risks Faced by Home Healthcare Workers.

In addition, exposure to harmful substances or environments rose 22 percent. “Workplace homicides increased by 83 cases to 500 in 2016, and workplace suicides increased by 62 to 291. This is the highest homicide figure since 2010 and the most suicides since Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) began reporting data in 1992.”

Stunnningly, overdoses from the non-medical use of drugs or alcohol while on the job increased from 73 in 2011 to 217 in 2016. “Overdose fatalities have increased by at least 25 percent annually since 2012.” Fatal injuries in the leisure and hospitality sector were up 32 percent and reached an “all-time series high in 2016.” BLS concluded that this was largely due to a 40-percent increase in fatal injuries in the food services and drinking places industry.

Occupations with increases greater than 10 percent in the number of fatal work injuries in 2016 include:

  • Food preparation and serving related occupations (64 percent);
  • Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations (20 percent);
  • Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance occupations (14 percent); and
  • Sales and related occupations (11 percent).

Foreign-born workers made up about one-fifth of the total fatal work injuries. Thirty-seven percent of the workers were born in Mexico, followed by 19 percent from Asian countries. Workers age 55 years and over had a higher fatality rate than other age group.

In response to the BLS Report, Loren Sweatt, Deputy Assistant Secretary for OSHA, commented that “[a]s President Trump recognized by declaring opioid abuse a Nationwide Public Health Emergency, the nation’s opioid crisis is impacting Americans every day at home and, as this data demonstrates, increasingly on the job.” “The Department of Labor will work with public and private stakeholders to help eradicate the opioid crisis as a deadly and growing workplace issue.”

Employers in the industries identified in the CFOI Report, including oil and gas, construction, retail, mining, and others need to be mindful of OSHA’s and MSHA’s enhanced monitoring and inspection activities. Take steps to ensure that company safety and health policies and training are up-to-date and are being rigorously implemented. Be sure to have a plan in-place for when an agency inspector does come calling, so that the company is protected and any citations and liabilities are minimized.