• Ten Republican senators informed Lafe E. Solomon, NLRB Acting General Counsel, that they “strongly disagreed” with the Board’s decision to issue an unfair labor practice complaint alleging that Boeing illegally transferred certain production work on its 787 Dreamliner aircraft from Washington state to a new nonunion facility in South Carolina in retaliation for lawful strikes by the Washington employees, who are represented by the International Association of Machinists. Further, House Republicans requested the NLRB turn over documents and communications regarding the Board’s accusations that Boeing violated federal law. The Job Protection Act, H.R. 1976, was also introduced in the House. According to its proponents, the Job Protection Act would block the NLRB from moving forward with the case against Boeing, or taking similar action against other companies. The bill provides that the NLRB cannot order an employer to relocate jobs from one location to another and guarantees an employer the right to decide where to do business within the United States. The House bill contains the same text as the bill previously introduced into the Senate.
  • Nineteen Republican senators signed a letter to President Obama calling the recent NLRB complaint against Boeing Co. a “government-led act of intimidation” against employers that build manufacturing plants in right-to-work states, and they vowed to block confirmation of Lafe Solomon and Craig Becker, Obama’s nominees to the agency, if the White House does not withdraw the nominations. Republican lawmakers also held a press conference criticizing Solomon for authorizing the controversial unfair labor practice complaint against Boeing Co. The press conference followed a meeting between the lawmakers and more than 60 business leaders that had been convened to discuss the NLRB complaint.
  • President Obama sent the Senate his nomination of Harry Hoglander, the current chairman of the NMB, to serve for a fourth term. The NMB traditionally rotates the chairmanship among its three members on July 1 of each year.
  • AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka delivered a speech targeting Democratic politicians. Trumka said that unions will spend the summer “holding elected leaders in Congress as well as the states accountable on one measure: Are they improving or degrading life for working families?” He added that if “leaders aren’t blocking the wrecking ball and advancing working families’ interests, working people will not support them.”