In an ex parte letter delivered to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski, the nation’s top providers of phone and cable-based Internet services took aim at proposals to reclassify broadband as a Title II service that is subject to common carrier regulation, warning that such a move would “plunge the industry into years of litigation and regulatory chaos” and betray “decades of bipartisan support for keeping the Internet unregulated.” Filed on Monday, the letter responds to comments filed by advocacy groups Free Press and Public Knowledge in the FCC’s ongoing proceeding to codify the agency’s 2005 net neutrality principles as part of the FCC’s rules. In their comments, Free Press and Public Knowledge in the FCC’s ongoing proceeding to codify the agency’s 2005 net neutrality principles as part of the FCC’s rules. In their comments, Free Press and Public Knowledge argue that the FCC should invoke its ancillary authority to regulate the Internet under Title II of the 1934 Communications Act and thus subject cable and phone-based ISPs to open access rules that apply to telecommunications carriers under Title II. The commenters believe that broadband services offered by phone and cable companies constitute a stand-alone transmission service to which e-mail, web hosting and similar offerings are no longer functionally tied. Decrying as “dubious” the groups’ assertion that “the data-processing and transmission components of broadband Internet access are no longer integrated,” AT&T, Verizon Communications, the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, Time Warner Cable and various other signatories told Genachowski that the groups’ proposal would “suppress the private innovation and investment—at both the core and the edge of the network—that have made the Internet the most powerful engine of economic growth in our time.” AT&T and its co-signers also noted that “tens of millions of consumers continue to view ISP-provided e-mail and similar applications as integral components of the broadband and Internet access services offered to them,” as they recalled previous Supreme Court findings that “Internet access service inherently involves information processing and interaction with stored data” that are “the hallmarks” of unregulated Title I information services.