The Senate Aging Committee has released a staff report entitled “Improving Audits: How We Can Strengthen the Medicare Program for Future Generations.”  The report describes the burden audits can impose on providers, and raises concerns that CMS’s current efforts are “aimed more at identifying and recovering improper payments that have already occurred, rather than a proactive strategy to ensure that those errors are not made in the first place.” For instance, the Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) contingency fee structure “could be viewed as providing an incentive to keep improper payment rates high.” The report also notes that inconsistent local coverage determinations (LCDs) can increase the burden on providers and contractors, since different rules apply depending on the location of the service provided. Moreover LCDs have not been targeted to the most costly, highly-utilized services in a consistent way and may lead to discrepancies in access to care based on the beneficiary’s location. The report includes a series of recommendations for reforms of the audit and local coverage decision processes, including consolidating post-payment review activities; revising the RAC incentive structure to focus on reduced improper payment rates; assessing the effectiveness of pre-payment review processes; improving provider education; and ensuring that LCDs are targeted and do not create inconsistent access to care. The report was issued in connection with a hearing on improving the Medicare audit program.