• Boris Johnson sets out Brexit plan: Boris Johnson has set out his own plan for Brexit in an article for the Telegraph entitled “a better plan for Brexit”. The ex-foreign secretary wrote that there had been a “collective failure of government, and a collapse of will by the British establishment, to deliver on the mandate of the people”. He further stated that the UK should negotiate a “Super Canada” free trade deal and that his vision would not lead to a hard Irish border, with any checks carried out away from the crossing. (The Telegraph)
  • UK nationals would suffer under skills-based immigration, warns EU’s Brexit negotiator: Guy Verhofstadt, the former Belgian prime minister who represents the European parliament in Brexit negotiations, has informed the home secretary, Sajid Javid, that the UK’s own nationals would suffer if it introduces a post-Brexit immigration system that discriminates between European citizens according to their skills. The policy is likely to be unveiled at the Conservative party conference, which begins on Sunday. (The Guardian)
  • No-deal Brexit could trigger 14 days of road disorder: Highways England has confirmed under a freedom of information request that Operation Brock, the code name for the management of freight in a no-deal scenario, would not be automatic and would require steel barriers to make a planned contraflow system on the M20 safe for ordinary vehicles. This means that there could be considerable disruption to roads until the middle of April if there was a no-deal exit from the EU on 29 March 2019. (The Guardian)
  • Most UK companies yet to begin preparations for Brexit: Nearly two-thirds of UK companies are still not preparing for Brexit and, in the event of a no deal scenario, many would cut both investment and recruitment, a survey of 2,500 enterprises across the country has found. Adam Marshall, director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce, which conducted the research last month, stated that failure to reach a political agreement would have “real-world consequences”. (The FT)