Most government agencies rely on an informal rulemaking process when drafting and finalizing rules interpreting the law. This process generally requires the appropriate government agency to notify the public of the proposed new rule or proposed modifications to existing rules. The government agency generally must consider all comments received before finalizing a rule.

An exception to the public-comment period generally applies for “emergency” or “temporary” rules. Emergency and temporary rules are usually effective immediately, but are temporary in length. Unless the agency takes additional action, most temporary and emergency rules will expire. A formal rulemaking and comment period generally applies before an emergency or temporary rule becomes permanent.

We encourage our clients and blog readers to participate in the rulemaking process.

The Oregon Department of Revenue (ODOR) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on October 19, 2017. ODOR scheduled a public hearing regarding these proposed rules on November 28, 2017 in Salem, Oregon.

ODOR proposes the adoption of two new rules – OAR 150-475-2030 and 150-475-2030. The stated need for the latter rule is to “codify the tax categorization of various products sold by marijuana retailers.” However, our review of the proposed rule includes a drafting error, inconsistent defined terms between the proposed rule and state statute, and an attempt to subject the sale of cannabis “seeds” to the state’s 17 percent retail sales tax. Our view of the applicable Oregon statute is that the retail sales tax does not apply to cannabis seeds as currently drafted and the proposed rule improperly classifies cannabis seeds as “immature plants.” Our Cannabis Team drafted and submitted the following public comments to ODOR and intends to attend the public hearing in Salem later this month.