The OIG has issued a report entitled “Vulnerabilities in Medicare’s Interrupted-Stay Policy for Long-Term Care Hospitals.”  By way of background, the Medicare long-term care hospital (LTCH) interrupted-stay policy generally treats time spent at an LTCH before and after an interruption as a single stay, rather than considering the second portion of the LTCH stay to be a readmission with a separate payment. However, LTCHs receive payment for a second stay if a beneficiary returns home, receives services from multiple facilities before returning to the LTCH, or is discharged to an inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) hospital, inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF), or skilled nursing facility (SNF) and then readmitted to the LTCH after the applicable “fixed-day threshold” – a specified number of days that varies by the type of intervening facility. The OIG identified several vulnerabilities in the LTCH interrupted-stay policy, including inappropriate payments, financial incentives to delay readmissions, and potential overpayments to co-located LTCHs. The OIG estimates that in 2010 and 2011, Medicare inappropriately paid $4.3 million to LTCHs and “intervening facilities” (facilities that treated the patients during the interruptions in the LTCH stay) for interrupted stays, and potentially millions of dollars more for inappropriate readmissions. The OIG points out that the readmissions may be appropriate, but the OIG raises concerns regarding “whether financial incentives, rather than beneficiaries’ medical conditions, may have influenced some LTCHs’ readmission decisions.” The OIG recommends a series of steps to address identified vulnerabilities, including CMS analyses, enforcement, and recoupment of identified overpayments. Previously, in the May 15, 2014 proposed Medicare IPPS/LTCH PPS update for FY 2015, CMS proposed to expand the interrupted stay policy by adopting the same 30-day standard as the fixed-day threshold for a discharge to and readmission from an IPPS hospital, IRF or SNF.