On May 27, the European Council, which represents the governments of EU Member States, revised the Directive on the Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RoHS Directive), and extended a ban on certain hazardous substances to a wider range of products, including medical devices, electronic toys, electrical appliances, cables, and spare parts. First adopted in 2003, the RoHS Directive bans six hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, including lead, mercury and cadmium. With the amendment, the ban will now in principle apply to all electrical and electronic equipment as well as to cables and spare parts. Certain transitional periods are provided for, e.g., monitoring and control devices and medical devices will be covered in three years, in vitro medical devices in five years and industrial control appliances in six years. There are also a few exceptions such as photovoltaic panels that produce energy from solar light and energy-saving light bulbs. EU countries are required to adopt the revised RoHS legislation into their national legal codes within 18 months.