“Hybrid” wage-hour class actions are by no means a new concept. 

In a “hybrid” class action, the named plaintiff files suit seeking to represent classes under both the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and state wage-hour laws.  As the potential recovery and limitations periods for these claims are often very different, so, too, are the mechanisms used for each. 

In FLSA claims, where classes can be “conditionally certified” if a plaintiff satisfies a relatively low burden of establishing that class members are “similarly situated” – a phrase nowhere defined in the statute – only those persons who affirmatively “opt in” to the lawsuit become class members.  In state wage-hour claims, governed by Federal Rule 23 (or a state law equivalent), a plaintiff generally must satisfy a higher standard – establishing numerosity, commonality, typicality, adequacy and superiority – and, if a class is certified, only those persons who affirmatively “opt out” are removed from the class.

The differences between these two mechanisms can be confusing even for lawyers, particularly in “hybrid” class actions where both are used simultaneously.  It is not difficult to understand how class members would find such proceedings even more confusing, especially if they receive notices telling them how to “opt in” to one type of wage-hour class and “opt out” of another, where the claims themselves sound identical to a layperson.  If class members wish to participate in both classes, they need to figure out that they must “opt in” to the FLSA class and do nothing as to the state law class.  And if they wish to participate in neither, they need to figure out that they should do nothing as to the FLSA class, yet “opt out” of the state class.  Anyone who has every received a class notice in the mail knows that, try as the court and parties might, those notices can be as difficult to navigate as trying to read the instructions for assembling a new bicycle. 

Because of the differences between the two mechanisms, the way the claims proceed under them, and the potential confusion, some employers have successfully argued that the two mechanisms were incompatible – a plaintiff had to choose whether to pursue federal or state law claims.  However, the circuit courts around the country have increasingly weighed in, ruling that the claims are not incompatible and that plaintiffs may pursue “hybrid” class actions.  Now, the Ninth Circuit has joined the chorus, issuing an opinion in Busk v. Integrity Staffing in which it determined that federal and state wage-hour claims may “peacefully co-exist” in the same action.

Unless and until the Supreme Court weighs in with a different opinion, it would seem that they “hybrid” class action is here to stay.  For employers, that means increased potential exposure in wage-hour class actions as plaintiffs can and will pursue both federal and state claims in the same action.  And it also means increased litigation activities, as parties in “hybrid” class actions normally will deal with two separate sets of class certification briefing – one on the FLSA claims, one on the state law claims – as well as two notices if classes are certified on each. 

The upside for employers?  To the extent there is one, it is that the inclusion of the FLSA claim ensures that the case can be removed to federal court at the outset.