When trouble, in the form of adverse changes in financial conditions or the property marketing environment, strikes during the period between construction contract signing and completion of procurement and construction activities, the developer often will have to consider taking the course of action that will maximize value for all stakeholders. Ultimately, it may reluctantly determine that the construction contracts and work should be suspended for some period of time or terminated altogether. Our white paper Shutting Down the Construction Project, updated to include California's mechanic's lien laws effective July 1, 2012, outlines significant issues that an owner should consider when suspending or terminating a California commercial construction project.

Things to consider include providing notice of the suspension/termination, if the contract is suspended, keeping the contract and subcontracts in effect, and closing out the claims exposure. Similar principles apply to projects in other states and projects of a residential, industrial or public nature. As becomes quickly apparent, the laws governing these issues are highly technical and often impose short deadlines for compliance, and also pose signfiicant risk to owners and contractors for non-compliance. To learn more about this, click here to our white paper.