• UK’s Chequers Brexit plan ‘won’t work’, says Donald Tusk: Theresa May’s proposed new economic partnership with the EU “will not work”, the head of the European Council has said. Donald Tusk said the plans risked undermining the EU’s single market. He was speaking at the end of an EU summit in Salzburg where leaders of the 27 remaining member states discussed Brexit. Mrs May has urged them to “evolve” their position on the Irish border and back her “serious” proposals. There is still no agreement on issues including how to avoid new checks on the Northern Ireland-Republic of Ireland border. At a press conference, Mr Tusk said there were some “positive elements” in the UK’s blueprint for future relations with the EU, which was agreed by ministers at Chequers in July. But, he added: “The suggested framework for economic cooperation will not work.” Mr Tusk added that October would be the “moment of truth” for reaching a deal, and that “if the conditions are there” an additional summit would be held in November to “formalise” it. (BBC)
  • Macron urges EU leaders to stand firm against Theresa May: The French President has appealed to his fellow European leaders to maintain their tough approach to Brexit in response to Theresa May’s demand for compromise and accusations that the French president wants to make Britain suffer. Macron, who is fighting a rearguard action against the rise of populism in Europe, said blocking any attempt by the UK to pick and choose elements of EU membership had to be the priority in the dying days of the Brexit negotiations. “May spoke last night,” Macron said of the UK prime minister’s presentation to the leaders in Salzburg. “My first wish is to stay united and to have a common approach, the 27. It is essential. The second thing is that we remain coherent. The solution must be found. The third thing is that we need to have a real retirement agreement by November.” A number of fellow EU leaders have conceded that compromise from both sides is needed to reach a deal both on avoiding a hard border on the island of Ireland and on the future framework of a trade deal. (The Guardian)
  • ‘Seven in 10’ EU workers in UK would be barred under Brexit proposals: The majority of EU workers in the UK would not be eligible to work in the country following Brexit if they were subject to proposals put forward by the government’s chief migration advisers, analysis by a leading leftwing thinktank shows. EU citizens currently in the UK are expected to be protected under the terms of the UK-EU withdrawal agreement but findings by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) illustrate how proposals by the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) will potentially restrict businesses recruiting migrants from the EU in future. (The Guardian)
  • Brexit will have ‘worse economic impact on UK than EU’: Brexit will have a bigger economic impact on the UK than the European Union, says the former head of the European Central Bank. Jean-Claude Trichet added the break-up was “totally contrary to the new world” of large emerging economies, with single currencies and single markets. Asked how Brexit would affect the other EU countries, he said: “It’s very much a question of proportion.” The EU’s economy is worth about £13tn, compared to the UK’s £2tn. Speaking to the Wake up to Money programme, he said: “If I take the EU as a whole and compare the GDP of the EU to the GDP of the UK, you see there’s a small portion which is the UK.” He added: “It’s normal that the European 27 are less impacted themselves than the UK by this event which has been entirely decided upon by the UK – when all the 27 wanted the UK to stay”. (BBC)