• In most cases, future loss of earnings should only be awarded until an employee is likely to obtain an equivalent job; career-long compensation will only be appropriate where there is no real prospect of the employee ever securing an equivalent job. (Wardle v Credit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank, CA)
  • The EAT has ruled that tribunals have been wrong to apportion discrimination compensation awards between two or more respondents (such as the employer and the employee perpetrator) where the loss caused is indivisible. Liability is joint and several so that the wronged party can recover the full award from any of the respondents. (London Borough of Hackney v Sivanandan, EAT)