FOOD SAFETY AND HYGIENE (ENGLAND) REGULATIONS 2013

On 31 December 2013, the Food Safety and Hygiene (England) Regulations (“2013 Regulations”) came into force. The 2013 Regulations repeal and replace the General Food Regulations 2004 (insofar as they apply to England) and the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006.

The 2013 Regulations do not introduce new requirements but instead consolidate the food safety and hygiene laws for England into one piece of legislation. This is an attempt to address the concerns raised by businesses that it was difficult to find the law relevant to them as the law was piecemeal with various amending statutory instruments.

The main change to note is that the 2013 Regulations bring into effect the enforcement provisions of European law setting out the requirements relating to the hygienic production of sprouted seeds and seeds intended for sprouting.

MEAT PRODUCTS (ENGLAND) REGULATIONS 2014

From 23 January to 6 March 2014 DEFRA is consulting on the introduction of new regulations governing meat products which would bring English legislation in line with European requirements. The proposed regulation would come into force on 13 December 2014.

The proposed regulations would introduce other changes such as new and simpler enforcement powers for regulators but would still include similar restrictions on, for example, the use of certain animal parts in meat products.

THE LICENSING ACT 2003 (MANDATORY LICENSING CONDITIONS) ORDER 2014 (“ORDER”)

The Order is due to come into force on 6 April 2014 and introduces a new mandatory condition for existing and future premises licence. The new condition requires licence holders to “ensure that no alcohol is sold or supplied for consumption on or off the premises for a price which is less than the permitted price”.

The lowest “permitted price” that alcohol can be sold at is the cost of the alcohol duty added to the VAT that is payable on that duty.

The Order was published following the Government’s recent guidance on banning the sale of alcohol below the cost of duty plus VAT in England and Wales, instead of introducing a minimum unit price for alcohol.