On January 27, 2014, the Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs tabled five international IP treaties in the House of Commons:

  • the Madrid Protocol, which provides for the international registration of trade-marks in multiple countries by way of a single application,
  • the Singapore Treaty, which harmonizes formal procedures for registration of trade-marks,
  • the Nice Agreement, which provides an international classification of goods and services for use in registering trade-marks,
  • the Hague Agreement, which provides for the international registration of an industrial design in multiple countries by way of a single application, and
  • the Patent Law Treaty, which harmonizes formal procedures such as the requirements to obtain a filing date.

According to policy on the tabling of treaties, before the Canadian Government can proceed to ratification, the Government will observe a waiting period of at least twenty-one sitting days before introducing the necessary implementing legislation in Parliament.  Members of Parliament will have opportunities to debate, present and vote on motions.  The Government would then subsequently introduce the implementing legislation for the treaties.  The implementing legislation will likely require a number of amendments to existing IP statutes.  Only once the implementing legislation is adopted could Canada then consent to be bound by the treaties.