Earlier this week, the American Telemedicine Association reported an important clarification regarding the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (“CMS’s”) plans for expanding reimbursement for telehealth services provided to Medicare beneficiaries. The October 31, 2014 final rule with comment period regarding payments to physicians generated much excitement in the telehealth community, particularly because it opens a door, albeit only slightly, to possible Medicare coverage for remote patient monitoring services.

However, the ATA has clarified with CMS just how far this door is ajar at the present time. While CMS has added a new CPT code (99490) for “chronic care management” (described by CMS in the final rule as a service “designed to pay separately for non-face-to-face care coordination services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions”), and this new code does not require the patient to be present during the care encounter, CMS still will not allow any additional payments for CPT code 99091 (collection and interpretation of physiologic data) if it is bundled with the new code 99490. According to the article, “[CMS] will allow providers to count the time they spend reviewing data towards the monthly minimum time for billing the chronic care management code. CMS expects that this accommodation will enhance the utilization of the 99490 service.” As the ATA article points out, while CMS has acknowledged that data collection is a valuable service and should be incorporated into chronic care management, the CY 2015 PFS apparently will not allow additional payment for these data collection efforts.

Telehealth providers still should feel encouraged by the positive strides that the final rule makes to reimburse providers for a widening range of telehealth services provided to Medicare beneficiaries. Interested providers should follow related Congressional efforts to pursue payment under Medicare for remote patient monitoring. While the recent final rule may have yielded less momentum on the Medicare reimbursement front than originally thought, it is momentum nonetheless.