The August applicable federal rate (“AFR”) for use with estate planning techniques such as CRTs, CLTs, QPRTs and GRATs is 2.2%. This is down from the July rate of 2.4%. The rate for use with a sale to a defective grantor trust, self-cancelling installment note (“SCIN”) or intra-family loan with a note of a 9-year duration (the mid-term rate, compounded annually) is also down slightly, to 1.89%. Remember that lower rates work best with GRATs, CLATs, sales to defective grantor trusts, private annuities, SCINs and intra-family loans. The combination of a low AFR and a decline in the financial and real estate markets continues to present a potentially rewarding opportunity to fund GRATs in August with depressed assets you expect to perform better in the coming years. However, the Obama Administration, in its 2012 fiscal budget, has proposed to curtail significantly short-term and zeroed-out GRATs. We anticipate that this may become an even hotter topic in light of the recent budget and debt ceiling debates in Washington. Therefore, GRATs should be funded as soon as possible in order to be grandfathered from the effective date of any law that may be enacted.

Clients also should continue to consider “refinancing” existing intra-family loans. The AFRs (based on annual compounding) used in connection with intra-family loans are 0.32% for loans with a term of 3 years or less, 1.89% for loans with a term of 9 years or less and 3.86% for loans with a term of longer than 9 years.

Thus, for example, if a nine-year loan is made to a child and the child can invest the funds and obtain a return in excess of 1.89%, the child will be able to keep any returns over 1.89%. These same rates are used in connection with sales to defective grantor trusts.