• Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., Chair of the new Senate Privacy Subcommittee, last week asked Apple and Google to ensure that their “app” stores offer “clear, understandable privacy policies.” The request came in a letter to the companies following up on questions Sen. Franken asked company representatives at the May 10 Subcommittee hearing (see May 16 edition). “Requiring that each app in your stores have a clear, understandable privacy policy would not resolve most of the privacy concerns in the mobile market. But it would be a simple first step that would provide users, privacy advocates, and federal consumer protection authorities a minimum of information about what information an app will access and how that app will share that information with third parties,” the Senator wrote. “Apple and Google have each said time and again that they are committed to protecting users’ privacy. This is an easy opportunity for your companies to put that commitment into action.” More information about the Senator’s request can be found here.
  • The United States and the United Kingdom have committed to continuing cooperative efforts on cybersecurity. Meeting last week during President Obama’s state visit to the U.K, the President and British Prime Minister David Cameron reaffirmed “close bilateral cooperation” between the countries, and both have committed their country to participating in the London International Cyber Conference which will be held in November 2011. During the President’s visit, it was also announced that the U.K. will join the Budapest Convention on Cybercrime, which sets standards for national laws dealing with online fraud and enables cooperation between nations on combating cybercriminals. The United States and 30 other countries are already signatories to the Convention, and have committed to “more effectively deploy resources in building technological capacity in the developing world.” For more information on U.S./U.K. cooperation on cybersecurity, click here.