• After reaching an impasse in its negotiations with the Committee for Recognition of Nursing Achievement with which it had been negotiating the contracts of 2,700 nurses, Stanford Hospital & Clinics and Lucile Packard Children´s Hospital put its last, best, final offer into effect, imposing a four percent wage increase, limiting paid time off benefits, extended bereavement leave to cover sons- and daughters-in-law, changing long term disability benefits, and changing grievance and arbitration procedures, among other changes. Union President Lorie Johnson characterized the hospital´s actions as “a declaration of war” and “a blatant attempt to try to force us to accept a bad contract.”
  • The National Football League filed an unfair labor practice charge against the National Football Players Association alleging that the NFPA violated Section 8 of the National Labor Relations Act by engaging in “surface bargaining and an anticipatory refusal to bargain” by failing to engage in good faith negotiations on topics including workers´ wages and hours. The NFL´s concern is that the union is delaying bargaining for the purpose of allowing its members to decertify their own union, thereby positioning the players to sue the NFL over the issue of whether a threatened lock violates federal antitrust law.
  • For the third time since August 2010, Washington Hospital Center registered nurses voted to authorize a one day strike against the Washington, D.C. based hospital. The parties are attempting to reach a new labor agreement. If the nurses go ahead with the one day strike, the hospital plans to use a staffing agency which will hire replacement nursing staff for a 60 hour week, thereby displacing the striking nurses for a week.
  • California based Prime HealthCare Services Inc. accused the Service Employees International Union-United Healthcare Workers West of running an extortion campaign against it. Recently, the SEIU published a report claiming that rates of septicemia diagnosis of Medicare patients treated at Prime´s facilities are higher than average, which the SEIU claims suggests either Medicare fraud or infection control problems. Some California state legislators have requested investigation into the issue. Prime and SEIU are locked in contentions collective bargaining negotiations.
  • According to the Labor Department´s Bureau of Labor Statistics, work stoppages increased from five in 2009 to 11 in 2010. During 2010, more than three times the number of employees idled in 2009 were prevented from working due to work stoppages. Thirteen thousand employees were stopped from working in 2009 and that figure skyrocketed to 45,000 in 2010. This resulted in 302,000 lost workdays in 2010, up from 124,000 in 2009. A construction workers strike in Chicago resulted in the largest number of lost work days when 15,000 workers were stopped from working for a total of 180,000 workdays during an approximate two-week walkout. The longest work stoppage was a four week strike which took place in Pennsylvania. Despite these recent increases, the general trend is that major stoppages have steadily declined overall since the late 1970s.