Yesterday, the U.S. Department of the Treasury today announced that it is engaged with more than 50 countries and jurisdictions around the world to improve international tax compliance and implement the information reporting and withholding tax provisions commonly known as the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”).

FATCA was enacted in 2010 as an effort to combat tax evasion by U.S. persons holding investments in offshore accounts. Under FATCA, certain U.S. taxpayers holding financial assets outside the United States must report those assets to the IRS. In particular, FATCA requires certain U.S. taxpayers holding foreign financial assets with an aggregate value exceeding $50,000 to report certain information about those assets on a new form (Form 8938) that must be attached to the taxpayer’s annual tax return. Underpayments of tax attributable to non-disclosed foreign financial assets will be subject to an additional substantial understatement penalty of 40 percent.

FATCA will also require foreign financial institutions to report directly to the IRS certain information about financial accounts held by U.S. taxpayers or by foreign entities in which U.S. taxpayers hold a substantial ownership interest. To properly comply with these new reporting requirements, foreign financial institutions (“FFI”) will have to enter into a special agreement with the IRS by June 30, 2013, pursuant to which the FFI will be obligated to: undertake certain identification and due diligence procedures with respect to its accountholders; report annually to the IRS on its accountholders who are U.S. persons or foreign entities with substantial U.S. ownership; and withhold and pay over to the IRS 30% of any payments of U.S. source income

The Treasury Department has already concluded a bilateral agreement with the United Kingdom. Additional jurisdictions with which Treasury is in the process of finalizing an intergovernmental agreement and with which Treasury hopes to conclude negotiations by year end include: France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, Switzerland, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Guernsey, Ireland, Isle of Man, Jersey, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Norway.

Jurisdictions with which Treasury is actively engaged in a dialogue towards concluding an intergovernmental agreement include: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, the Cayman Islands, Cyprus, Estonia, Hungary, Israel, Korea, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Malta, New Zealand, the Slovak Republic, Singapore, and Sweden. Treasury expects to be able to conclude negotiations with several of these jurisdictions by year end.