Earlier this month, surprising many in the industry, the Drug Enforcement Administration announced it is proposing to significantly increase the amount of cannabis it will permit to be grown for research purposes in 2019. The 2018 limit, about 1000 pounds, will be increased to over 5400 for 2019, an over five-fold increase. The proposal remains open for public comment for the next 30 days, then the DEA will make final decisions on the matter.

Until 2016, only the University of Mississippi was permitted to grow cannabis for federally approved research purposes. But very few licenses were approved, and in most cases researchers learned that the low quality of product from Ole Miss made research essentially worthless. The Obama Administration, in its last months, approved a dramatic increase in research and opened up the right for other institutions to apply to grow cannabis for that purpose. Dozens applied, but Attorney General Jeff Sessions, until now, had not let any licenses be approved. Some believe it is relentless pressure on Sessions from the Senate that has led him not to stand in the way of this new action. In a hearing almost a year ago he had even admitted that adding more grow facilities for research could be “healthy.”

Cannabis medical research has been exploding elsewhere, particularly in Israel. For example, a published, peer-reviewed study earlier this year from there showed that over 95% of thousands of tested cancer patients said their condition improved with the use of cannabis. There is also a state-funded “Center for Medical Cannabis Research” in California that has commenced several studies, including one on the efficacy of CBD on autism spectrum disorder. Another California group is studying whether smoked cannabis can help with post-traumatic stress disorder. Most of these studies, however, are not “double blind” clinical trials given the federal restrictions. Many in the industry hope that the expanded DEA licensing will open the door to more exploration of the potential medical benefits of cannabis.