Turkey has updated processes for zoning changes regarding protected areas. Changes also remove the requirement to prepare wide-scope zoning plans including transition stages, for buildings and facilities to be built on coastal areas.

The Regulation Regarding Amendment of the Regulation on Preparation of Zoning Plans for Protected Areas (“Amendment Regulation”) was published in Official Gazette number 29910 on 6 December 2016, entering into effect on the same date. The Amendment Regulation makes changes to the Regulation on Preparation of Zoning Plans for Protected Areas dated 23 March 2012 (“Regulation”).

Under the Regulation, implementation of all zoning plans must cease if an area is declared to be a natural protected area. The Amendment Regulation introduces an exemption, allowing protective zoning plans to be implemented if a natural protected area changes status.

If the status changes in these ways, the applicable protective zoning plans will continue to be implemented (to the extent not violating principle resolutions stipulated for the new statues) until a new zoning plan is prepared:

– Status changes from First Degree natural protected areas to either:

– Qualified Natural Protected Area.

– Sustainable Protection and Restricted Use Area.

– Status changes from Second and Third Degree natural protected areas to Sustainable Protection and Restricted Use Areas.

Authorities are required to prepare protective master and implementation development plans for protected areas. The Amendment Regulation extends the permitted time period from 18 months to three years.

Protective zoning plans must include the entirety of the natural protected area within its scope, and have transition stages. The Amendment Regulation excludes buildings and facilities to be constructed on coastal areas from this requirement.

Please see this link for the full text of the Amendment Regulation (only available in Turkish).

Information first published in the MA | Gazette, a fortnightly legal update newsletter produced by Moroğlu Arseven.