On April 19, the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey dismissed a fired executive’s suit against a global financial services firm alleging whistleblowing retaliation claims under Dodd-Frank under the standard set by the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Digital Realty Trust Inc. v. Somers. (See Buckley Sandler Special Alert on Supreme Court Decision here.) Specifically, the U.S. District court lifted a stay, which the court had imposed pending a decision in Digital Realty Trust, and granted the defendant’s motion to dismiss with prejudice. Noting that the purpose of Dodd-Frank’s anti-retaliation provisions is “to incentivize individuals … to come forward and provide information of securities law violations to the SEC,” the court determined that the plaintiff “had ample time between when he first learned of the violations and his termination to report the misconduct to the SEC,” but he chose not to lodge claims “until well after the fact of the alleged securities violations, his testimony to FINRA and his own termination.” The court also rejected the argument that testimony given to FINRA is sufficient to invoke Dodd-Frank’s whistleblower protections, noting that the plaintiff’s testimony to FINRA “plainly” did not meet statutory requirements.