In Ehling v. Monmouth-Ocean Hospital Service Corp., the District Court in New Jersey recently denied the employer’s motion to dismiss the plaintiff’s cause of action for invasion of privacy in connection with a supervisor having gained unauthorized access to her private Facebook account.  The plaintiff nurse, who was also the union president at the hospital, had posted comments on her Facebook wall about the news story out of Washington, D.C. in 2009 concerning the killing of a security guard at the Holocaust Museum by a white supremacist in which she expressed her opinion or rant that the paramedics in D.C. should have let the shooter die rather than help him after he was shot during the incident:  “He survived [and] I blame the DC paramedics.  I want to say 2 things to the DC  medics.  1.  WHAT WERE YOU THINKING?  and 2.  This was your opportunity to really make a difference!  WTF!!!!  And to the other guards…. go to target practice.”  The supervisor apparently wanted access to plaintiff’s Facebook comments because of her leadership role with the union, and convinced a co-worker to give him access to her private account so he could copy her postings. When he saw the comments about the D.C. incident he sent a copy to the State Board of Nursing suggesting that it represented an improper disregard for patient safety.

On the employer’s motion to dismiss the invasion of privacy claim on the grounds that there can be no expectation of privacy with respect to Facebook postings, the court decided that the question whether the plaintiff had a reasonable expectation of privacy was for a jury to decide based on the circumstances, including the number of “friends” who had access to her Facebook wall where the plaintiff claimed that she had restricted access to her friends but did not provide access to any supervisors or members of management.  The court did not address the separate question whether a rant expressing an opinion about a news report could be considered an expression of one’s “private affairs” subject to protection under invasion of privacy law, and did not address the fact that Facebook specifically includes in its Privacy Policy a disclaimer to the effect that there is no guarantee of privacy and that users make postings at their own risk inasmuch as anyone with access can copy or share comments with anyone they choose.