Two yellow pads are full of notes, diagrams, thoughts and arguments and still the answer eludes me. So, rather than continue not to post anything about all the interesting stuff going on in mass torts while I try to figure it out I'll just throw out what I've got so far over a series of posts and move on to something less difficult (and likely more interesting). On then to the question that's been bugging me for a month.

Should alternative liability, in the form of burden of proof shifting, apply in the following case: (1) a neonate contracted a Cronobacter sakazakii infection and was seriously injured; (2)  C. sakazakii is a ubiquitous pathogen and readily forms biofilms on stainless steel, inside household water pipes and upon other surfaces (3) C. sakazakii infections in neonates have also been repeatedly traced to PIFs; (4) plaintiff's experts opined that it's more likely than not that the source of C. sakazakii was the powdered infant formula (PIF) fed to the neonate; (5) PIFs are not sterile since the process of sterilization would destroy the nutritional value of the PIF; (6)  there were two or more suppliers of PIF whose product was prepared for the neonate; (7) none of the remaining PIF fed to the newborn, nor any of the lots from which they were drawn, were found to contain C. sakazakii; and, (7) the wrong complained of was a failure to warn that full term neonates, like the plaintiff, were at risk of C. sakazakii infections.

Alternate liability analysis often begins with Summers v. TiceIn that case both hunters who had fired their weapons in plaintiff's direction had been sued and both could be shown to have breached their duty to safely handle those weapons. Because it was impossible for the plaintiff to show whose buckshot was responsible for his injury, and because it was deemed just that the consequence of that impossibility fall on the culpable defendants rather than the innocent and injured plaintiff, the court held that the defendants, rather than the plaintiff, should bear the burden of proving from which shotgun the pellets had originated. Fair enough.

Here, in Burks v. Abbott Laboratories, both of the manufacturers of PIF consumed by the plaintiff had also been sued. Furthermore, neither's product bore a warning about the hazard which plaintiff claimed they had a duty to disclose. However, not all the possible sources of C. sakazakii (Mother Nature being judgment-proof) were before the court. Nevertheless, the court held, though it "located very little authority on this specific question" that  the determination of whether it was more likely than not  that the source of plaintiff's C. sakazakii infection was the defendants' PIF should be applied to the defendants collectively.

Ponder the consequences. Let's say that 51% of all C. sakazakii infections in neonates are due to PIFs even when C. sakazakii can't be isolated from the product or the lot from which it was drawn, and that 49% of all C. sakazakii infections in neonates are due to C. sakazakii found in the household water used to reconstitute the PIF or on kitchen surfaces. Also, assume the warning could fairly be said to be lacking (which in this case is not at all a given and in fact raises as many questions as stacking defendants to get to the 51% threshold - but that'll be addressed in subsequent posts).

If there's only one supplier of PIF there's no need for alternative liability so assume there are at least two. But what happens when you start dividing up the 51% among the defendants? Unless one of them was responsible for ~99% of the product the result is that you've stacked two defendants who might, but probably didn't, have something to do with plaintiff's infection and handed them all of the liability for it. Is that fair? What if there were 100 suppliers? And what's the justification for stacking defendants? Is it because they're in the same business? If so, how similar must their businesses be to permit such stacking? If in order to get to a 51% likelihood as to the source of the infection you had to stack PIF manufacturers with stainless steel kitchen appliance manufacturers (because C. sakazakii happily lives on stainless steel and creates biofilms that makes it nearly impossible to remove with household cleaning products) could you justify handing them the burden of proof by saying they were all in the food business? 

Or what about reducing defendants' liability by Mother Nature's share? Would that solve the "overdeterrence" problem? What follows from the fact that the potential for these sorts of infections, due to the nature of pathogens, is essentially binary (you get it or you don't) and not of the dose-response variety seen in typical mass tort cases?  These are the sorts of questions that have led to a lot of head scratching but so far few answers.Over the next couple of days I'll type up more of these questions and the paths down which they lead (at least the ones I've thought of and followed).

How a fact pattern like the one in Burks gets resolved is I think a very big deal. That's because an awful lot of diseases laid over the last forty years at the feet of man-made substances and bad habits turn out to have been due to pathogens all along. It also appears we're entering an era in which old scourges reemerge thanks to having evolved antibiotic resistance and new ones arise thanks to globalization.  The resulting morbidity and mortality will makesevery other mass tort pale in comparison and so far juries aren't having much trouble blaming defendants for the depredations of Mother Nature's tiniest critters. We think there's a wave of litigation coming in which plaintiffs will assert liability for facilitating the transmission of pathogenic agents. The answers to questions like those posed by Burks will be critical in determining how it all plays out.