The Department of Commerce has released its 2017 year-end report on U.S. International Trade in Goods and Services, revealing a sharp increase in the overall trade deficit during President Trump’s first year in office. For 2017, the goods and services deficit increased to $566 billion, a $61.2 billion (12.1 %) increase from 2016. Exports were $2,329.3 billion in 2017, up $121.2 billion (5.5%) from 2016. Imports were $2,895.3 billion in 2017, up $182.5 billion (6.7%) from 2016.

The 2017 figures show surpluses, in billions of dollars, with South and Central America ($34.3), Hong Kong ($32.5), Netherlands ($24.5), Belgium ($14.8) and Australia ($14.6). Deficits were recorded, in billions of dollars, with China ($375.2), the European Union ($151.4), Mexico ($71.1), Japan ($68.8), Germany ($64.3), Ireland ($38.1), Italy ($31.6), Malaysia ($24.6), India ($22.9), South Korea ($22.9), Thailand ($20.4), Canada ($17.6), Taiwan ($16.7), France ($15.3), Switzerland ($14.3), Indonesia ($13.3) and OPEC ($13). Of note, the deficit with China increased $28.2 billion to $375.2 billion in 2017, and the deficit with Mexico increased $6.7 billion to $71.1 billion in 2017.