• Theresa May has finally struck a deal with Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party to prop up her minority government. This will allow a working commons majority of 13 that will ensure May wins the key vote on the Queen’s speech on Thursday. The deal is controversial in guaranteeing an extra £1bn will go into the Northern Ireland budget. There are still doubts that this will be enough to push through the Brexit legislation in the Commons. A small rebellion will leave the Prime Minister in difficulty and with tight Brexit deadlines any delay could unravel control of the entire timetable. (FT.)
  • Theresa May has said she wants EU citizens living in the UK to stay after Brexit as she announced plans designed to put their “anxiety to rest”. All EU nationals living in the UK lawfully for at least five years will be granted “settled status” and be able to bring over spouses and children. Those who come after an as-yet-unagreed cut-off point will be given two years to “regularise their status”. A 15-page document outlining the detail of the UK’s offer to EU citizens has been published as Theresa May addresses MPs on the outcome of Friday’s EU summit – at which she first set out her plans. Crucially May has said that any deal on their future legal status and rights must be reciprocal. (BBC.)
  • Brexit Secretary David Davis has told the BBC he is “pretty sure”, but not “certain”, that he will be able to get a free trade deal with the EU. He told BBC One’s Andrew Marr Show that other EU states “have a very strong interest in getting a good deal”. But he said that if the UK was only offered a “punishment deal” then it had to be prepared to “walk away”. His Labour shadow Sir Keir Starmer said Mr Davis should focus on getting the best deal, not “preparing for failure”. Mr Davis also agreed that a Tory leadership contest would be catastrophic for the Brexit negotiations. (BBC.)
  • The Financial Times reports that informal talks are taking place between MPs from all parties who voted Remain in last year’s referendum. These are with the purpose of pursuing a softer exit from the EU. Whilst Conservative MPs who voted Remain are likely to be subdued until after the critical vote on the Government’s proposed legislative programme on Thursday, these voices will be heard much more loudly once the vote has passed. At least 30 Conservative MPs are understood to have indicated that they will not accept leaving the EU without an agreed deal. This has given Labour MPs belief that a cross-party alliance against the government over Brexit may be possible. (FT.)