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Results: 11-20 of 34

Solicitor General decides not to file petition for review in United States v. Nosal: Circuit split on Computer Fraud and Abuse Act remains
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • August 3 2012

The Solicitor General indicated yesterday that he will not file a petition for a writ of certiorari with the Supreme Court in U.S. v. Nosal


Colorado federal court decision in non-compete dispute demonstrates importance of drafting enforceable forum selection provisions in business transactions
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • April 6 2012

As part of the process of acquiring of a business and retaining key employees of the acquired business, multiple agreements surrounding the parameters and contingencies of the transaction are often drafted, including asset purchase agreements and employment agreements


Top 10 2011 developmentsheadlines in trade secret, computer fraud, and non-compete law
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • January 17 2012

We have compiled a list of the top 2011 developmentsheadlines in trade secret, computer fraud, and non-compete law


The Federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act is back in play for employer suits against dishonest employees in the Ninth Circuit
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • May 2 2011

On April 28, 2011, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held in an important decision upholding legal protections for employer data that employees may be held liable under the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (18 U.S.C. 1030 et seq.) in cases where employees steal or remove electronic files or data in violation of their employers' written computer-use restrictions


Minnesota district court dismisses Computer Fraud and Abuse Act claim brought against former employee based upon narrow interpretation of Act
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • March 21 2012

In another decision that underscores the circuit split regarding the interpretation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act’s (CFAA) language on authorized access, the Honorable Judge David Doty of the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota has dismissed an employer’s claim that its former employees violated the Act


Key Computer Fraud and Abuse Act case heard by Ninth Circuit en banc panel: can rogue employees be held liable for data theft under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act?
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • December 16 2011

The Ninth Circuit held oral argument on the key United States v. Nosal case yesterday before an en banc panel


Federal Court questions whether damages exist in LinkedIn account ownership dispute
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • March 2 2013

The ownership of social media accounts in the employment context remains a very hot topic. In fact, you might remember the case of Eagle v. Morgan


US Supreme Court strikes down Oklahoma Supreme Court decision and holds that arbitrator, rather than court, must determine the enforceability of non-compete agreements containing arbitration provisions
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • December 5 2012

There are not many issues that the United States Supreme Court can unanimously resolve in five short pages


Fitness companies spar over unauthorized access of departing employee's personal e-mail accounts
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • January 25 2011

Wrongfully accessing someone's personal email account may cost you $1,000 per unauthorized access, even if that person suffers no injury or loss


Missouri Supreme Court reaffirms that Missouri is a pro non-compete jurisdiction, enforcing non-competition and modified non-solicitation agreements against non-resident former security company employees
  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • USA
  • August 21 2012

The Missouri Supreme Court recently issued a decision, Whelan Security Co. v. Kennebrew, et al., 2012 Mo. LEXIS 167, reaffirming Missouri as a pro non-compete jurisdiction for employers