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Results: 1-10 of 57

Wiping the slate clean: when fake movie products have real-world counterparts
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada, USA
  • September 24 2013

Often when practicing entertainment law, particularly in Canada, attempts to analyze a particular situation run up against a road-block: there seems


Question and answer: who owns the copyright in an interview?
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • February 4 2011

While this may seem to be an obscure (or least inconsequential) question, it has relevance not just for journalists, but for freelance writers, documentarians, creators of non-fiction works and novelists


Rush and Rush: using music in political activities (Redux)
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • March 15 2012

News reports that Rush (the band) have demanded that Rush (the Limbaugh) desist from using the band's music in his radio broadcasts have re-raised an issue we have considered here at the Signal on few different occasions


Contracting with minors - a comparative approach
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • October 21 2010

Recent news that the voice actor behind "Dora the Explorer" has filed suit against the producers of the show on the basis that the contract signed by the actor (who is a minor) is "unconscionable" offers a chance to review an area of entertainment law which is drastically different on either side of the CanadaUS border


Manson v John Doe - damages for anonymous online defamation
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • February 28 2013

The recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Manson v John Doe (2013 ONSC 628) offers an opportunity to reflect on both the


Gross: criminal obscenity in film and TV productions
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • January 2 2013

On December 22, 2012, one of the stranger criminal law stories in recent Canadian history came to an end: Quebec-based special effects artist Remy Couture


Turmel v CBC (Dragon's Den): leave to SCC denied
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • December 22 2011

Following up on a story we discussed earlier this year (Turmel v CBC (Dragons' Den) - Enforceability of Depiction Releases), the Supreme Court of Canada has denied leave to appeal to the plaintiff in the case of Turmel v CBC (Dragon's Den


Baglow v Smith - court clarifies its ruling
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • November 28 2011

A couple of months ago we reported on the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Baglow v. Smith (2011 ONSC 5131


Invasion of privacy tort in Ontario - implications for entertainment lawyers
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • January 19 2012

The question of whether Ontario law recognizes a tort cause of action for invasionbreach of privacy has long been a contentious one - but it has finally been definitively settled in the affirmative


Warman v Fournier: infringement assessed
  • Heenan Blaikie LLP
  • Canada
  • July 3 2012

The recent Federal Court of Canada decsion in Warman v Fournier (2012 FC 803 - for reasons which elude me, the decision is not yet available on the Federal Court's website, but Howard Knopf has generously uploaded a copy) has occasioned a host of thoughtful observations (see Knopf, Trosow, Geist), which I can only summarize and add a few hopefully trenchant elements of my own analysis