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Results: 1-10 of 100

Sony BMG Music Entertainment, et al. v. Tenenbaum
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • December 16 2009

In a file-sharing copyright infringement action, the court grants plaintiff record companies’ motion for summary judgment on the issue of defendant’s fair use defense


Jordan v. Sony BMG Music Entertainment Inc., et al
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • December 16 2009

Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals holds that plaintiff was time-barred under the Copyright Act from suing for co-ownership of defendant’s copyright because more than three years had elapsed since defendant registered with the Copyright Office; court also holds that the copyright registration solely in defendant’s name was sufficient to put the plaintiff on constructive notice that defendant claimed sole ownership in the work


Sony BMG Music Entertainment, et al. v. Tenenbaum
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • December 16 2009

Court grants plaintiff record companies’ request for a permanent injunction barring defendant from downloading unauthorized copies of plaintiffs’ copyrighted works and requiring defendant to destroy all such files, but court denies plaintiffs’ request for a permanent injunction barring defendant from “promoting” use of the internet to infringe copyrights, on First Amendment grounds


Latin American Music Company, et al. v. American Society of Composers Authors and Publishers
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • February 3 2010

First Circuit holds that the district court did not err in declining to instruct jurors that a termination of a copyright transfer must be in writing to be valid


The SCO Group, Inc v Novell, Inc
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • February 3 2010

Court grants in part and denies in part defendant’s motion for summary judgment on plaintiff’s slander of title claim relating to software copyrights


Petrella v. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc., et al.
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • February 10 2010

In copyright infringement suit brought by the heir of an author of a screenplay that allegedly became the basis of the motion picture Raging Bull against the copyright owners of the picture, district court grants defendants’ motion for summary judgment based on the equitable defense of laches where plaintiff had knowledge of the legal theories asserted in the action as early as 1990 and refrained from filing suit until 2009 because the picture was allegedly not yet profitable


UMG Recordings, Inc. v. Veoh Networks Inc
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • April 14 2010

District court denies Veoh Networks’ motion for attorney’s fees in DMCA safe harbor litigation, holding, inter alia, that Veoh failed to demonstrate that UMG acted in bad faith by failing to use DMCA’s notice and takedown procedure before filing suit and that UMG’s claims were not objectively unreasonable


Vent v. Mars Snackfood US, LLC, et al
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • May 27 2009

Court grants defendants’ motion to dismiss plaintiff’s idea misappropriation claim regarding an idea for marketing M&M’s candies because plaintiff’s idea was not novel and was not shared in confidence


Lewinson v. Henry Holt and Company, LLC, et al
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • September 30 2009

In copyright infringement action, court holds that plaintiff’s manuscript for a children’s story depicting children around the world saying “pacifier” in different languages and defendants’ children’s book depicting children around the world saying “peace” in different languages are not substantially similar


Andersen v. Atlantic Recording Corporation
  • Loeb & Loeb LLP
  • USA
  • November 25 2009

In plaintiff’s action against record companies alleging various claims related to the wrongful initiation of civil proceedings, summary judgment is granted in favor of defendants where the Noerr-Pennington Doctrine protected the record companies’ right to file suit without fear of liability