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Results: 1-10 of 118

Second Circuit eases tension between U.S. discovery requirements and E.U. Privacy laws
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • European Union, USA
  • August 11 2016

Microsoft scored an important victory when the Second Circuit ruled that the government is not authorized to issue warrants for customer data stored


Accenture employee faked medical leave to work for a competitor while stealing data from Accenture computers
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • November 29 2010

The recent case of Accenture, LLP v. Sidhu, 2010 WL 4691944 (N.D. Ca. Nov. 9, 2010) is a classic example of how the 9th Circuit’s holding in LVRC Holdings, LLC v. Brekka, 581 F.3d 1127, 1130-31 (9th Cir. 2009) has led to the dismissal of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) claims (or criminal counts) in circumstances in which an employee is clearly not authorized to access the company computers


Employee e-mails to personal counsel held to be protected by attorney-client privilege
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • May 14 2010

The New Jersey Supreme Court in Stengart v. Loving Care Agency has held that an employee’s communications with her attorney were protected by the attorney-client privilege and, thus, off limits to review by her employer notwithstanding the employer’s corporate computer policies reserving all rights to review employee e-mails


How do you sue an unknown hacker?
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • May 19 2010

The question was answered this week by a federal district court in Connecticut in the case of GWA, LLC v. Cox Communications, Inc. and John Doe


California court holds that an employee can be sued under the CFAA for deleting company files
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • June 17 2010

Without referring to its Circuit's controlling decision of LVRC Holdings LLC v. Brekka, 581 F.3d 1127, (9th Cir. 2009) , a federal district court in San Jose, California permitted a Computer Fraud and Abuse (“CFAA”) claim to proceed against an ex-employee for deleting files from her former employer’s computer


How do you sue an unknown hacker who steals data through the company web site?
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • February 7 2011

In Liberty Media Holdings, LLC. v. Does 1-59, 2011 WL 292128 3 (S.D.Cal. Jan. 25, 2011) unknown individuals hacked into Liberty Media Holdings’ web servers and obtained “certain motion pictures” that it “reproduced and distributed . . . onto their local hard drives and other storage devices.”


Message from New York court: rely on CGL policy coverage for data breaches at your own peril
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • March 3 2014

A New York trial court announced a decision on February 21, 2014, that may be a harbinger of wide-reaching limitations on insurance coverage for data


Recognizing risks arising from invasion of privacy claims in the workplace
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • February 13 2013

One of the most significant liabilities that a company in California faces relates to claims that it has invaded an individual's privacy rights


Holding passwords hostage international extortion foiled
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • January 19 2012

In a case recently filed by a Swiss company in federal court in Florida, the company alleged in its complaint that Jerome Westrick, its former computer programmer and minority shareholder, stole a company laptop, hacked into the company’s computer system, changed access codes and passwords, and locked out the company and its customers from getting into its enterprise content management software


Can you rely on your corporate computer policies to sue ex-employees who steal company data?
  • Dorsey & Whitney LLP
  • USA
  • December 21 2010

Two recent district court opinions add to the caselaw providing judicial guidance on how employers might update their corporate computer policies to be able to sue ex-employees for stealing company data based on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act ("CFAA"), the federal computer crime statute