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Results: 1-10 of 69

Trade-marks and product placement: the use of branded products in film and television productions
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • February 2 2011

In the last issue of the The Cassels Brock Report, I addressed the issue of trade-mark rights in titles as the first in a series of articles on trade-marks in the film and television industries


Landmark counterfeiting case awards Louis Vuitton and Burberry $2.5 million in damages: Louis Vuitton Malletier S.A. v. Singga Enterprises (Canada) Inc
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • July 28 2011

A recent landmark decision by the Federal Court awarded luxury brands Louis Vuitton and Burberry $2.48 million, the highest amount of damages awarded in a Canadian anti-counterfeiting case


The edible play dough
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • United Kingdom, Canada
  • March 22 2011

A recent judgement of the High Court of the United Kingdom illustrates the problems relating to launching a new product and an interesting application of the principles relating to trade-mark infringement


Continuous use required
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • July 10 2012

A recent decision of the Trade-marks Opposition Board upheld an opposition on the basis that the applicant had not used the applied-for mark since the date set out in the trade-mark application


No-name package causes confusion in the dark
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • October 15 2012

The Federal Court of Appeal in Canada recently held that a no-name cigarette package depicting registered design trade-marks, but no word mark, was confusingly similar to the word mark MARLBORO which was registered for use in association with cigarettes


Big changes to Canadian trademark law: what they mean for you
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • April 29 2015

On June 19, 2014, the Parliament of Canada completed the final steps to pass Bill C-31, the somewhat cryptically-named Act to implement certain


Use of a composite mark may not be use of a registered mark
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • March 18 2011

A recent decision made in the context of Section 45 of the Trade-marks Act illustrates the importance of ensuring that a trade-mark is used in the form in which they are registered


Brand management in Canadian law
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • October 18 2010

Many businesses invest a great deal of time and effort developing their "brand."


Bathroom tissue must be in view to be distinctive
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • September 28 2010

In Scott Paper Limited v. Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LP, the Federal Court of Canada set aside a decision of the Trade-marks Opposition Board and allowed a trade-mark application for registration of a trade-mark design used on bathroom tissue


Positive steps: portions of Canada’s Combating Counterfeit Products Act come into force
  • Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
  • Canada
  • December 12 2014

Bill C-8, the Combating Counterfeit Products Act (the "CCPA"), received Royal Assent on December 9th, 2014. The CCPA creates new civil and criminal