We use cookies to customise content for your subscription and for analytics.
If you continue to browse Lexology, we will assume that you are happy to receive all our cookies. For further information please read our Cookie Policy.
In cooperation with Association of Corporate Counsel
  Request new password

Search results

Order by most recent / most popular / relevance

Results: 1-10 of 20

Google Books is fair use and provides “significant public benefits”

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • December 31 2013

Since 2004, the Google Books project has scanned over 20 million books and has provided digital copies of the books to participating libraries while

“Hot news” cannot be enjoined under misappropriation claim

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • July 31 2011

In a case that attracted significant amici attention, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, invoking the copyright law principal of preemption, vacated an injunction against an internet news service that was based on a tort claim of misappropriation

Constitutional challenge to (file sharing) damage award rebuffed

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • October 31 2011

The U. S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit was less sympathetic than the district court to a Boston College graduate student who was found to have used file sharing software to distribute copyrighted music, concluding that the district court erred in reducing the damage award based on due process concerns

DMCA safe harbor analysis now the same in both Ninth and Second Circuits

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • April 30 2013

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has withdrawn its 2011 opinion applying the "safe harbor" provision of the Digital Millennium

Second Circuit revives copyright infringement suit against non-resident for uploading copyrighted material online

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • June 30 2011

Employing the standard set out by the New York Court of Appeals in internet copyright infringement cases, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has revived a copyright infringement suit brought by a New York resident against a non-resident based upon defendant’s alleged uploading of copyrighted materials onto the internet

No “safe harbor” for BitTorrent website operator

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • April 30 2013

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed a summary judgment ruling in favor of seven film studios finding that the defendant induced

Next time, buy the CDs

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • July 31 2013

Following the lead of other courts addressing statutory penalties for illegal music downloading, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit

Second Circuit refuses to enjoin Aereo’s internet streaming of broadcast television

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • May 31 2013

Addressing the legality of a streaming TV service that provides internet-streaming of broadcast television programming, the U.S. Court of Appeals for

eBay abrogates presumption of irreparable harm in copyright cases in Ninth Circuit

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • August 31 2011

Considering the impact of the Supreme Court’s 2006 ruling in the patent infringement case eBay Inc. v. MercExchange, L.L.C. on copyright cases, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit Court held that irreparable harm may no longer be presumed upon showing a likelihood of success when seeking preliminary or permanent injunctive relief in copyright infringement cases

“Situs of the injury” for exercising personal jurisdiction over defendant for online copyright infringement is location of copyright owner

  • McDermott Will & Emery
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • April 29 2011

In a decision favorable to copyright owners based in the state of New York, the New York State Court of Appeals held that in copyright infringement cases involving the uploading of copyrighted literary works onto the internet, the situs of the injury for purposes of determining personal jurisdiction under New York's long-arm jurisdiction statute is the location of the copyright holder and not the location of the infringing conduct