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Results: 1-7 of 7

Another expensive lesson for employers

  • LK Shields
  • -
  • Ireland
  • -
  • September 5 2012

In February of this year, the Equality Tribunal made an award of 315,000 in compensation against O’Callaghan Hotels for harassment, discrimination and victimisation of a former senior employee

"Without prejudice" conversations: risks and pitfalls

  • LK Shields
  • -
  • Ireland
  • -
  • August 31 2012

"I'm not sure this is working out ... can we speak "off the record" ... ?"

Anti social networking: lessons from case law

  • LK Shields
  • -
  • Ireland
  • -
  • February 8 2012

"Will the highways on the internet become more few?"

The high cost of redundancy

  • LK Shields
  • -
  • Ireland, United Kingdom
  • -
  • November 3 2011

A number of decisions published over the last six months indicate that the Employment Appeals Tribunal (EAT) and the Courts appear to have little sympathy for employers in redundancy cases and will not shy away from making large awards when employers get it wrong

Absenteeism: how to manage unauthorised short term absences from the workplace

  • LK Shields
  • -
  • Ireland
  • -
  • May 11 2011

Unauthorised absences are both frustrating and costly for employers

Whistleblowers, corruption and election promises

  • LK Shields
  • -
  • Ireland
  • -
  • February 1 2011

The Prevention of Corruption (Amendment) Act 2010 was signed into law in December 2010 and contains specific protection for employees who disclose wrongdoing in the context of their employment (whistleblowers

When fair isn't fair enough

  • LK Shields
  • -
  • Ireland
  • -
  • December 31 2010

Employers know that their disciplinary procedures must be patently fair and transparent, but just how fair do they have to be?