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Results: 1-7 of 7

An employee is stealing company documentsthat can’t be protected activity, right?

  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • July 3 2013

A supervisor discovers that an employee has recently downloaded thousands of pages of confidential Company billing and financial information, and

Global employment, pensions and incentives newsletter

  • Herbert Smith Freehills LLP
  • -
  • Africa, Australia, China, European Union, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Russia, Singapore, Spain, United Kingdom, USA
  • -
  • April 15 2014

Most of the labour codes in force in francophone sub-Saharan Africa contain provisions which seek to prevent unfair competition practices among

Cloak and dagger

  • Day Pitney LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • October 31 2011

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held that one can violate the Economic Espionage Act of 1996 (EEA) even if the pilfered trade secret would not benefit a direct competitor on the specific project

Losing defendant in FCA suit accuses relator’s counsel and relator of conspiracy to misappropriate trade secrets in furtherance of qui tam lawsuit

  • Sidley Austin LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • February 24 2014

On February 10, 2014, following a recent jury finding that pipemaker J-M Manufacturing ("J-M") was liable for damages in a False Claims Act suit

Trade secret litigation: it's getting criminal

  • Foley & Lardner LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • October 4 2011

One would think that a civil jury award of $1.3 billion (even one that may be subsequently reduced by a judge to $272 million) would provide sufficient warning to companies about the perils of trade secret litigation. But, as the long-running dispute between SAP AG and Oracle Corporation makes clear, defendants should be concerned not just about the possibility of an adverse civil judgment, but also the possibility that matters can get much worse

Former employee's theft of trade secrets leads to criminal charges and ultimate federal prison sentence.

  • Seyfarth Shaw LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • December 28 2010

On December 13, 2010, Kevin Crow was sentenced to serve thirty-six (36) months in Federal prison, without parole, which prison term was to be followed by 3 years' supervised release

SOX claim dismissed: rejection of IP assignment clause not protected activity

  • Proskauer Rose LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • August 7 2014

The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois recently granted a Rule 12(b)(6) motion to dismiss a SOX whistleblower retaliation