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Results: 1-6 of 6

MAFIAA Fire potentially meets its match

  • Foley Hoag LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 11 2011

Back in May, we wrote about MAFIAA Fire, a browser plug-in created by anonymous coders to counteract the government’s efforts to shut down copyright-infringing web sites by seizing the domain names

Court orders identity of BitTorrent users to be revealed in copyright case

  • Foley Hoag LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 3 2011

BitTorrent users now have even more reason to be concerned if they are targeted in “John Doe” lawsuits for copyright infringement

Update: Blizzard owns your software

  • Foley Hoag LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • January 10 2011

As expected, the Ninth Circuit has declared link that Blizzard's World of Warcraft (WoW) software licensees are just that -- licensees, and not owners -- because the WoW Terms of Use sufficiently restrict the transfer and use of the WoW software

Is your investment structurally sound? $1.3 billion copyright verdict illustrates the importance of due diligence

  • Foley Hoag LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • December 2 2010

Last week, a $1.3 billion verdict was handed down against SAP AG, the German software giant, after a lengthy litigation stemming from the acquisition of a company engaged in questionable -- and ultimately infringing -- business practices

Autodesk owns your software

  • Foley Hoag LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • September 23 2010

Autodesk owns your software if you (think you) own a copy of AutoCAD, that is

The DMCA: less protection than meets the eye against circumvention of technological measures to prevent access to software

  • Foley Hoag LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • September 16 2010

The anti-circumvention provision of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. 1201, continues to challenge courts in the context of computer software