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Results: 1-10 of 101

New York employer's flex-time policy precluded holding employee accountable for tardiness

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • March 13 2013

Flex-time policies are fairly common among U.S. employers, and allow employees to arrive and leave work within a defined time range, instead of

Retaliation against employee for filing worker’s compensation claim does not support california wrongful termination claim

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 13 2012

In Dutra v. Mercy Medical Center Mt. Shasta, the employee sued alleging, among other claims, that the hospital wrongfully terminated her in violation of public policy in retaliation for having filed a workers' compensation claim

Illinois Supreme Court holds employer liable for invasion of employee’s privacy by outside investigator

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 13 2012

In Lawlor v. North American Corporation (lower court opinion reported at FEB hyperlink), the Illinois Supreme Court ruled that the employer was liable for the actions of its outside investigator who engaged in "pretexting" to obtain a former employee's personal cell phone records

Employee fails to establish sexual harassment based on isolated events

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 10 2011

In Brennan v. Townsend & O'Leary Enterprises, Inc., a California court of appeal affirmed a judgment notwithstanding the verdict for the employer that overturned a $250,000 jury verdict in employee's favor for sexual harassment

California employers allowed to round employee time to nearest one-tenth of an hour for calculating overtime

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 13 2012

In a case of first impression, a California court of appeal ruled that employers may round nonexempt employee time to the nearest one-tenth of an hour for purposes of calculating overtime pay

Coca-Cola Company properly required employee to undergo mental examination after employee threatened co-workers

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • July 19 2013

In Owusu-Ansah v. The Coca-Cola Company, the employee challenged the employer's requirement that he undergo a mental examination as a condition of

Washington employer must reinstate employee after FMLA leave despite having doubts about employee's ability to perform job

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • March 13 2013

In Chaney v. Providence Health Care, Robert Chaney worked as a hospital radiologic technician in the State of Washington. Chaney was instructed to

Settlement approved of class action over requirement that Footlocker employees wear athletic shoes purchased at employee expense

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 13 2012

In Kullar v. Footlocker, a California court of appeal approved a settlement of a class action lawsuit for almost $1.3 million covering about 18,000 employees arising out of, among other claims, an employer requirement that the employees wear athletic shoes to work that had to be purchased at the employee's expense

Supervisor's violation of "personal space" sufficed to establish hostile environment claim

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 10 2010

In Vera v McHugh, an administrative coordinator for the US Army in Puerto Rico was required to share a small office space with her supervisor

Arbitration agreement with independent contractors ruled not applicable to employment-law disputes

  • Fenwick & West LLP
  • -
  • USA
  • -
  • November 13 2012

In Elijahjuan v. Superior Court (Mike Campbell & Associates, Ltd.), a class of newspaper delivery workers classified as independent contractors brought suit alleging that they should have been classified and paid as employees